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Date > 1900 > 1960-1969

Canadair CL-13 Sabre Mk VI fighter, 434 'Bluenose' Fighter Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, circa 1958-1962

Type: Image

This excellent American fighter was the main combat aircraft of the Canadian air force during the 1950s, capable of reaching speeds of 527 knots (975 km/h). Canadair made large numbers of North American F-86s in Montreal as the CL-13, using Canadian Orenda engines that were more powerful than the American engines. The Canadian flag replaced the tricolour strip on the rear aileron in 1954. (Canadian Department of National Defence, PCN-2664)

Site: National Defence

HMCS Bonaventure, Modified Majestic-class light fleet carrier, Royal Canadian Navy

Type: Image

HMCS Bonaventure was Canada's last aircraft carrier. Commissioned in 1956, the 'Bonnie' incorporated an angled flight deck and a steam catapult. Capable of Arctic operations, the ship carried McDonnell F2H-3 Banshee jet fighters, de Havilland Canada CS2F-2 Tracker anti-submarine warfare aircraft and Sikorsky CHSS-2 Sea King helicopters while in service from 1957 to 1969. (Canadian Department of National Defence, EKS-203)

Site: National Defence

1st Battalion, The Canadian Guards, Cyprus, 1965

Type: Image

Canadians serving with the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) are seen at a UN Observation Post. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

British Army folding iron barrack bed

Type: Image

This type of bed gradually replaced wooden double bunks from 1824. Every day, the bed was folded and the mattress rolled up for inspection. Army Circular Memorandum of 12 June 1860.

Site: National Defence

Lockheed CF-104 Starfighter, 417 Strike/Reconnaissance Operational Training Squadron, Canadian Forces, 4 June 1983

Type: Image

The U.S.-designed CF-104 Starfighter had a top speed of 1,260 knots (2,334 kph) and served in the Royal Canadian Air Force and Canadian Forces from 1961 to the mid-1980s. It equipped squadrons based in Germany. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 83-943)

Site: National Defence

Avro CF-100 Mk 4b fighter-interceptor

Type: Image

First seeing service in 1953, the Canadian-designed Avro CF-100 had a very large range for its day and could reach speeds of 525 knots (973 km/h). Its role was to attack enemy bombers detected by DEW Line radar stations in the Canadian Arctic. (Private collection)

Site: National Defence

McDonnell CF-101B Voodoo fighter, 425 'Alouette' All-Weather Fighter Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, circa 1974

Type: Image

A CF-101B Voodoo fighter intercepts a Soviet Tupolev Tu-95 'Bear' bomber used for reconnaissance in Canadian air space. This type of incident was frequent during the Cold War. Made in the U.S., the Voodoo was the Canadian Forces' main fighter from 1961 to 1984. With a top speed of only 1,220 kts (1,963 km/h), the Voodoo was definitely inferior to the CF-105 Avro Arrow. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 84-940)

Site: National Defence

de Havilland-Canada CC-108 Caribou light transport, Royal Canadian Air Force, circa 1965

Type: Image

The de Havilland Canada CC-108 Caribou's primary role was transport flying, and it saw action overseas in many United Nations (UN) missions. The aircraft shown was destroyed in August 1965 during a UN mission in India when it was strafed on the ground by a Pakistani Air Force fighter. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 67-962)

Site: National Defence

Parks Canada National Photo Collection

Type: Image

This impressive photo collection gives you a chance to see more than 40 000 beautiful images of Canada's national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. Search by keyword, type of heritage area, province or territory, name of heritage area.

Site: Parks Canada

Canadair CC-106 Yukon transport, Air Transport Command, Royal Canadian Airforce, 1967

Type: Image

The CC-106 Yukon four-engine transport, built by Canadair in Montreal, was the largest Canadian aircraft built of its time. It was used by the air force for transporting personnel until replaced by the Boeing 707 in 1981. Following the adoption of the red and white Canadian national flag, the blue external rings of the roundels on some Yukons were painted red, as shown in this photo. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 67-723)

Site: National Defence