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Date > 1900 > 1920-1929

Belmont Battery at Fort Rodd Hill, British Columbia

Type: Image

Built in 1898-1900 to protect the entrance to the Royal Navy (and later the Royal Canadian Navy) base on the Pacific, the battery has been restored to its appearance during the Second World War 1939-45. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Officer cadet, Royal Military College of Canada, 1954

Type: Image

Except for a few details, the full dress uniform of officer cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, remained essentially the same since the college was founded in 1874. As shown in this 1954 photo, only the shakos and pith helmets worn on parade by first-class officer-cadets disappeared, replaced by pill-box caps. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

Lieutenant, Canadian Air Force, 1920-1924

Type: Image

When the Canadian Air Force was authorized in February 1920, they were given the dark blue uniform seen in this painting of a pilot ranking as a lieutenant. Rank was shown by the traditional army system of crowns and stars, and pilots wore wings on the left breast. King George V granted the designation Royal Canadian Air Force in 1923. When the service was made a permanent part of the Department of National Defence the following year, it adopted the lighter 'RAF blue' uniform worn by its British counterpart. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Vickers Vedette flying boat, Royal Canadian Air Force, late 1920s

Type: Image

The Vickers Vedette was the first commercial aircraft built to a Canadian specification for Canadian conditions. The Royal Canadian Air Force needed an aircraft for forestry survey and fire protection patrols, and Canadian Vickers of Montreal responded with the British-designed Vedette with some adjustments for Canada. The RCAF bought 44 aircraft, which entered service in 1925. They were widely used in Canada's wilderness for communications with isolated communities and for making the photographic surveys needed for the preparation of maps by the Geological Survey of Canada. A replica of a Vedette is on display at the Western Canada Aviation Museum. (Department of National Defence photo)

Site: National Defence

The Quebec Citadel, circa 1950

Type: Image

Built between 1828 and 1856, the Quebec Citadel has remained largely the same ever since, as this 1950s picture shows. It is now the regimental HQ of the Royal 22e Régiment / Royal 22nd Regiment - the famous 'Van Doos'. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Sir Eugène Fiset

Type: Image

Sir Eugène Fiset (1874-1951) was a doctor, soldier, Deputy Minister of Defence, Member of Parliament, and Lieutenant Governor. (Private collection)

Site: National Defence

British Army folding iron barrack bed

Type: Image

This type of bed gradually replaced wooden double bunks from 1824. Every day, the bed was folded and the mattress rolled up for inspection. Army Circular Memorandum of 12 June 1860.

Site: National Defence

Regimental and King's Colours, 38th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915-21

Type: Image

The 38th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force was raised in Ottawa, in 1915. It served in Bermuda, and then joined the 4th Division of the Canadian Corps in France during 1916. Except for their distinctive insignia, the Colours of Canadian units were similar to those of the British until 1968. Just before the 38th Battalion left Ottawa in 1915, it was presented with the Regimental Colour shown (left) in this painting. The King's Colour was presented to the unit's successor, The Ottawa Regiment (Duke of Cornwall's Own) in 1921. (Canadian War Museum, K-73-137)

Site: National Defence

Cadet corps of the Zouaves pontificaux canadiens, Sacré-Coeur Parish, Chicoutimi, 1924

Type: Image

In French Canada, cadets were often attached to the Zouaves pontificaux canadiens. This Francophone religious paramilitary group was founded in 1899 by Charles-Edmond Rouleau. At the time it was believed that the Zouaves were more attuned to the French-Canadian community than the Anglophone-commanded Canadian Militia. The cadets' uniforms were modelled on those of the régiment des Zouaves pontificaux, a volunteer unit that was part of the army of the Papal State. Almost 400 Canadians served with the unit in Rome between 1868 and 1870. (Lemay photo, 1924. Archives nationales du Québec à Chicoutimi, 68810)

Site: National Defence

Private, 2nd Construction Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, circa 1917

Type: Image

The 2nd Construction Battalion was the first military unit of the Dominion of Canada to recruit Canadians of African origin. Racism made it impossible for them to join other units. The Construction Battalion was raised in July 1916, mainly from Nova Scotia volunteers. It served in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick for a year, and was then sent to France, where it served behind the lines building roads and railroads. The 2nd Construction Battalion followed in the footsteps of earlier pre-Confederation units such as Captain Runchey's Company of Colored Men (1812-1815), the Colored Infantry Company (1838-1850), and the Victoria Pioneer Rifle Corps (1860-1866). Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence