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Date > 1900 > 1910-1919

Belmont Battery at Fort Rodd Hill, British Columbia

Type: Image

Built in 1898-1900 to protect the entrance to the Royal Navy (and later the Royal Canadian Navy) base on the Pacific, the battery has been restored to its appearance during the Second World War 1939-45. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Officer cadet, Royal Military College of Canada, 1954

Type: Image

Except for a few details, the full dress uniform of officer cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, remained essentially the same since the college was founded in 1874. As shown in this 1954 photo, only the shakos and pith helmets worn on parade by first-class officer-cadets disappeared, replaced by pill-box caps. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

Map of the Military Districts of Canada, circa 1910

Type: Image

The Canadian ministry of Militia and Defence was established in 1868. The country was originally divided by the ministry into nine Military Districts. Additional districts were added later on.

Site: National Defence

Screened Road 'A' (unfinished), by war artist Alexander Young Jackson

Type: Image

An electronic reproduction of the oil on canvas artwork, "Screened Road 'A' (unfinished)," created by A.Y. Jackson in 1918.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Officer, The Prince Edward Island Light Horse, circa 1912

Type: Image

In 1901, L Squadron was raised in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, as one of a number of independent Militia squadrons created in the style of the six regiments of Canadian Mounted Rifles raised for the South African War. The unit was expanded in 1903 to become the The Prince Edward Island Light Horse. This officer wears the regiment's red dragoon-style tunic with yellow facings.

Site: National Defence

Sergeant, Fort Garry Horse, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1916

Type: Image

The Fort Garry Horse served with the Canadian Cavalry Brigade in France and Belgium between 1916 and 1918, training and waiting for the return of a type of warfare that had vanished in Western Europe. The cavalry tried to adapt, and in other theatres of war, its mobility was still extremely useful for scouting or use as fast-moving reserves. On the Western Front, however, there was little movement or manouvring until the final weeks of the war. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Sergeant, 1st Regiment The Grenadier Guards of Canada, circa 1912

Type: Image

In 1859, the 1st Battalion Volunteer Militia Rifles of Canada was ranked as the senior volunteer infantry regiment in the colony of Canada. In the years that followed, this Montreal battalion adopted a series of ever more impressive titles. In 1860 it was the 'Prince of Wales's Regiment' , in 1900, the 'Prince of Wales's Fusiliers'. In 1912, despite protests from the British government that the Canadians had no claim to the title, the unit became 'The 1st Regiment The Grenadier Guards of Canada.' At this point, the Montrealers also assumed the uniform of the senior British regiment of Foot Guards. A sergeant in red tunic and bearskin can be seen in this plate.

Site: National Defence

Squadron-Commander Raymond Collishaw and pilots of No.203 Squadron, Royal Air Force, July 1918

Type: Image

By the end of the First World War, Canadians made up roughly one quarter of the strength of the British Royal Air Force formed in April 1918. More than 8,000 Canadians served in the RAF and its predecessors, the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). This photograph shows one famous Canadian fighter pilot, Squadron- Commander Raymond Collishaw (1893-1975), along with his British and Imperial pilots at Allonville, France, July 1918. 208 Squadron was formed in February 1914 as Number 3 Squadron, RNAS. The aircraft in the background are the famous Sopwith F.1 'Camel.' (Library and Archives Canada, PA-002792)

Site: National Defence

Advertisement for 'Twin Navy' tobacco, circa 1911

Type: Image

For the Canadians of the day, their new fleet was clearly linked with the Royal Navy. It is worth noting that the warship shown in this circa 1911 advertisement is much larger than anything then in service with the Royal Canadian Navy. Also, McAlpin Tobacco was the Canadian branch of a New York company. (Private collection)

Site: National Defence

Sergeant, 66th Regiment 'Princess Louise Fusiliers', circa 1912

Type: Image

The 66th was a Halifax unit officially born in 1869, but which incorporating volunteer companies who had served the colony of Nova Scotia since 1859 . In 1879, the unit was permitted to adopt the name of HRH Princess Louise (1848-1939), daughter of Queen Victoria. She was the wife of Sir John Campbell, Marquess of Lorne (1845-1914), who was Governor General of Canada, 1878-1883. Despite their title, the 66th Regiment 'Princess Louise Fusiliers' does not seem to have adopted the fur fusilier cap.

Site: National Defence