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Quebec batteries firing on Phips' ships during October 1690

Type: Image

Part of Quebec's defences is shown firing upon the invaders’ ships during October 1690. The upper town was protected by a good wall with intermittent batteries. There were more defensive works up towards the Chateau Saint-Louis near Cape Diamond. In the lower town, facing the harbour, there were two strong French shore batteries armed with heavy 18 and 24-pounder naval cannon. Inland, a line of earthworks punctuated with 11 redoubts enclosed the city from the western side. This 19th century print is inaccurate in some details (for instance, the Château Saint-Louis which only had one storey in 1690) but gives a good sense of the general action. (Library and Archives Canada, C-006022)

Site: National Defence

The first Fort Chambly built in 1665

Type: Image

This model represents the original Fort Chambly. The original wooden log structure was built in 1665 and was typical of the early forts in Canada.

Site: National Defence

Parks Canada National Photo Collection

Type: Image

This impressive photo collection gives you a chance to see more than 40 000 beautiful images of Canada's national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. Search by keyword, type of heritage area, province or territory, name of heritage area.

Site: Parks Canada

The Château Saint-Louis and its fort at Quebec in 1683

Type: Image

The walls of the fort on Cap-Diamant were built in 1636 and stood until they were torn down in 1693. This contemporary print of 1683 shows the first Château Saint-Louis standing within the walls. It was built in 1647 and demolished in 1694 to build a larger building of the same name. In 1690, the second Château was the site of Count Frontenac’s celebrated response to a summons to surrender: "I will reply from the muzzle of my cannons". During the 1690 siege, the fort acted as the keystone of Quebec’s defences. The houses on the right side of this print border the narrow way down to the Lower Town, now called Petit-Champlain street.

Site: National Defence