History Browser

Search Results

Resource Type > Image

Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications

Date > 1900

Supermarine Spitfire L.F. Mk. IX fighter in the markings of 421 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force

Type: Image

The Spitfire Mk. IX was the third-generation of Supermarine's famous fighter, and the final one equipped with a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. The L.F. Mk. IX was an aircraft optimised for combat at lower altitudes - note the clipped wings shown in this photograph of a surviving example in the collection of the Canadian Aviation Museum. The aircraft bears the 'AU' code letters of 421 'Red Indian' Squadron, Royal Canadian Airforce. 421 Squadron was one of several Canadian fighter squadrons stationed in Europe. (Canadian Department of National Defence, PCN-5234)

Site: National Defence

Belmont Battery at Fort Rodd Hill, British Columbia

Type: Image

Built in 1898-1900 to protect the entrance to the Royal Navy (and later the Royal Canadian Navy) base on the Pacific, the battery has been restored to its appearance during the Second World War 1939-45. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Casualty evacuation, U.N. Protection Force in ex-Yugoslavia (UNPROFOR), 1994

Type: Image

Canadian military personnel evacuating a wounded United Nations soldier in Bosnia, 1994. (DND, 94-501A-4)

Site: National Defence

Bristol Bolingbroke IVT bomber

Type: Image

The Bristol Bolingbroke was a Canadian version of the British light bomber known as the Bristol Blenheim. Bolingbroke was the name given to the Canadian-built version of the Blenheim Mk. IV. Over 600 were built by the Fairchild plant at Longueuil, Quebec, starting in 1939. The Bolingbroke was the first modern, all aluminium aircraft built in Canada, but it was also obsolete before the first example flew. Nevertheless, for lack of anything better, the design was widely used. In July 1942, a Bolingbroke helped sink a Japanese submarine off British Columbia. The photograph shows a surviving Bolingbroke Mk IVT from the collection of the Canadian Aviation Museum. 457 of the Mk IVT were built and used as navigation and gunnery trainers (DND, PCN-5234)

Site: National Defence

Canadian M113 armoured personnel carriers, U.N. Protection Force in ex-Yugoslavia (UNPROFOR), 1993

Type: Image

These Canadian APCs seen at the Sarajevo airport are serving with the United Nations in Bosnia during the 1993 siege of the city. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 93-5381)

Site: National Defence

Canadian anti-aircraft gun

Type: Image

This anti-aircraft gun is set up above Juno Beach, Normandy, in June 1944. The star was used to mark Allied equipment, particularly for recognition from the air. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-1082)

Site: National Defence

Squadron-Commander Raymond Collishaw and pilots of No.203 Squadron, Royal Air Force, July 1918

Type: Image

By the end of the First World War, Canadians made up roughly one quarter of the strength of the British Royal Air Force formed in April 1918. More than 8,000 Canadians served in the RAF and its predecessors, the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). This photograph shows one famous Canadian fighter pilot, Squadron- Commander Raymond Collishaw (1893-1975), along with his British and Imperial pilots at Allonville, France, July 1918. 208 Squadron was formed in February 1914 as Number 3 Squadron, RNAS. The aircraft in the background are the famous Sopwith F.1 'Camel.' (Library and Archives Canada, PA-002792)

Site: National Defence

Avro CF-105 Arrow Mk.1, on its first flight, 1958

Type: Image

The Canadian-designed Avro CF-105 Arrow Mk.1 was the most advanced fighter in the world at that time, with a top speed of 1,324 knots (2,453 k/ph). It was expensive, however, and the government halted production. The five existing examples of this triumph of Canadian engineering were destroyed. All this stirred up such controversy that it remains a subject of passionate debate in the country more than 40 years later. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 82-384)

Site: National Defence

Advertisement for 'Twin Navy' tobacco, circa 1911

Type: Image

For the Canadians of the day, their new fleet was clearly linked with the Royal Navy. It is worth noting that the warship shown in this circa 1911 advertisement is much larger than anything then in service with the Royal Canadian Navy. Also, McAlpin Tobacco was the Canadian branch of a New York company. (Private collection)

Site: National Defence

Vickers Vedette flying boat, Royal Canadian Air Force, late 1920s

Type: Image

The Vickers Vedette was the first commercial aircraft built to a Canadian specification for Canadian conditions. The Royal Canadian Air Force needed an aircraft for forestry survey and fire protection patrols, and Canadian Vickers of Montreal responded with the British-designed Vedette with some adjustments for Canada. The RCAF bought 44 aircraft, which entered service in 1925. They were widely used in Canada's wilderness for communications with isolated communities and for making the photographic surveys needed for the preparation of maps by the Geological Survey of Canada. A replica of a Vedette is on display at the Western Canada Aviation Museum. (Department of National Defence photo)

Site: National Defence