History Browser

Search Results

Resource Type > Image

Subject > Wars, Battles and Conflicts

Date > 1700 > 1760-1769 > 1763

Gunner, Royal Regiment of Artillery, 1751-1764

Type: Image

This British artilleryman wears the blue coat of the Royal Regiment of Artillery. Gunners in most European armies wore dark-coloured clothing to disguise the dirt and grime that soon disfigured anyone firing artillery using gunpowder propellant. The yellow lace was added to the uniforms in 1750, and this pattern of clothing was worn from 1751 to 1764. Reconstruction by Derek Fitzjames. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Grenadier, 17th Regiment of Foot, 1750s

Type: Image

The 17th Regiment of Foot arrived at Halifax in 1757. It took part in the siege of Louisbourg as part of Brigadier James Wolfe's brigade. The 17th’s grenadiers were surprised by a French sortie on 9 July 1758. Their captain, Lord Dundonald, and part of the company were killed. The regiment was later part of General Amherst’s army, advancing up Lake Champlain in 1759 and down the Richelieu River in 1760. It fought at Île-aux-Noix and was at the surrender of Montreal in September 1760. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Private, 78th (Highland) Regiment of Foot, or Fraser's Highlanders, 1757-1763

Type: Image

The 78th (Highland) Regiment of Foot was at the siege of Louisbourg in 1758, at the siege of Quebec in 1759 and at the battle of Sainte-Foy in 1760. It remained in garrison at Quebec until disbanded in 1763, some of its men remaining in Canada as settlers. Reconstruction by R.J. Marrion. (Canadian War Museum)

Site: National Defence

Fort Prince of Wales

Type: Image

This aerial view shows Fort Prince of Wales, just across the Churchill river from present-day Churchill, Manitoba. Its construction began in 1717. The fort was taken without a fight by a French expedition to Hudson Bay in 1782. It was said to be the only sizeable bastioned stone fort on the Arctic Ocean. Its walls were restored in the 1950s. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Sir Guy Carleton, circa 1763

Type: Image

Guy Carleton (1724-1808) first came to Canada as the Quartermaster General of General James Wolfe’s army. Carleton’s future career in Canada was to be considerable as he was twice its governor, the first term being from 1766 to 1778, the second from 1786 to 1796. He was knighted in 1776 following his successful defence of Quebec against the Americans in 1775-1776. He is shown in the uniform of his 72nd Foot, scarlet faced with scarlet trimmed with gold lace, which would date this portrait by an unknown artist in a private collection between 1758 and 1763.

Site: National Defence

Louis XV, King of France from 1715 to 1774

Type: Image

King Louis XV of France (1710–1774) is shown wearing the royal robes. Around his neck are the collars and insignia of two orders of chivalry - the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece, and the French Order of Saint-Louis. The white 8-pointed cross of the latter order was awarded to many Canadain soldiers during the French regime in Canada. (Library and Archives Canada, C-000604)

Site: National Defence

Jean-Baptiste-Philippe Testard de Montigny (1724-1786)

Type: Image

Testard de Montigny was an officer in the Compagnies franches de la Marine. He distinguished himself in raids against New England in 1746-47, and then in Ohio and in the Great Lakes region during the Seven Years' War. He was made a Chevalier de Saint Louis in 1757.

Site: National Defence

Officer and marines, Corps of Marines, 1755-1765

Type: Image

The Corps of Marines (known as the 'Royal Marines' after 1802) was raised in 1755 and provided soldiers to serve on board Royal Navy ships. During the sieges of Louisbourg and Quebec, many marines served on land with the besieging army. The officers had tricorns and the enlisted marines mitre-shaped caps similar to but smaller than those of grenadiers. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Fort Chambly

Type: Image

The third fort on this site, construction began on Fort Chambly in 1709. It was made of stone and looked rather like a castle. This made it different from the low-lying, bastioned fortresses of Europe. The fort was built to be impressive and all but impregnable to Indian enemies and raiding American colonials. The fort wall facing the Richelieu River was pierced for artillery. During the War of 1812, Fort Chambly was the HQ for British and Canadian troops guarding the area south of Montreal against an advance by American armies. The complex fell into ruins during the 19th century. Its walls were stabilized in 1885 when it was made a Canadian government historic park. Recognized as a unique surviving example of military architecture, Fort Chambly was given a major restoration in the 1980s by Parks Canada. This returned the fort to its appearance of the mid-18th century.

Site: National Defence