History Browser

Search Results

Date > 1800 > 1890-1899

Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life

Resource Type > Image

Officer cadet, Royal Military College of Canada, 1954

Type: Image

Except for a few details, the full dress uniform of officer cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, remained essentially the same since the college was founded in 1874. As shown in this 1954 photo, only the shakos and pith helmets worn on parade by first-class officer-cadets disappeared, replaced by pill-box caps. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

Sergeant, Hamilton Field Battery, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1894

Type: Image

In 1894, the Canadian volunteer militia artillery included 17 field batteries. Field batteries were mostly armed with British 9-pounder Rifled Muzzle Loading guns, which were obsolete by the 1890s and were replaced with British 18-pounder Quick-Firing guns beginning in 1906. The uniform of the Royal Canadian Artillery was very similar to that of the British Royal Artillery except that Canadians normally wore white 'universal' pattern helmets on all occasions rather than the blue-black 'home service' helmet worn by the British gunners.

Site: National Defence

Officer, 2nd Battalion, Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, 1891

Type: Image

The Queen's Own Rifles, a Toronto volunteer regiment dating back to 1860, were second in seniority in the Canadia Volunteer Militia. They wore uniforms closely modelled on those of the British army. The white pith helmet was a passing fashion for the QOR - they had previously worn a black fur rifle busby, and would be wearing them again for full dress by 1900. The regiment was one of the most active Canadian volunteer units, fighting Fenians at Ridgeway in 1866 and Métis in Saskatchewan in 1885.

Site: National Defence

Private, The Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry, winter dress, circa 1899

Type: Image

In addition to the uniforms they wore during the winter, Canadian infantry were also provided with fur hats, scarves, winter coats similar to those worn by the British Army, mittens, and warm boots. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Canadian infantry barracks room, circa 1890

Type: Image

A rare glimpse into life as it was in a Canadian infantry barracks room during a winter evening in about 1890. Some men are shown cleaning their kit, the floor or a Snider-Enfield infantry rifle, one is being shaved, another trims his moustache and one is reading. The barracks furniture features the British iron folding bed and barrack table with iron legs. The men’s uniforms and equipment are neatly hung or shelved and a stove, essential in a Canadian winter, is prominent. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Rating in landing order, Royal Navy, 1892

Type: Image

This dress and armament was the standard gear from the 1860s onwards for armed parties sent ashore from ships of the Royal Navy to investigate the occasional piratical activities on the British Columbia coast.

Site: National Defence

Officer and gunners, Royal Regiment of Artillery, 1889

Type: Image

Royal Artillery detachments continued to be posted in Halifax until 1905 to serve the large coast defence guns which protected the naval base.

Site: National Defence

British Army folding iron barrack bed

Type: Image

This type of bed gradually replaced wooden double bunks from 1824. Every day, the bed was folded and the mattress rolled up for inspection. Army Circular Memorandum of 12 June 1860.

Site: National Defence

Officer and gunner, 1st Halifax Brigade of Garrison Artillery, 1891

Type: Image

The dress of Canadian gunners was virtually identical to that of the regular British artillery. After 1886, Canadian regulations ordered a white 'universal' pattern helmet for the Artillery, such as British troops wore in warm climates. Most militia units continued to wear the pillbox cap seen on the gunner in the background of this plate. The Halifax artillery unit had its origins in a militia battery raised in 1791. It went through several changes of title, becoming the 1st Halifax Brigade of Garrison Artillery in 1870. Men from the Garrison Artillery were part of the Halifax Battalion mobilized during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885.

Site: National Defence

Royal Navy officers and midshipmen, 1830s-1890s

Type: Image

The two officers at left wear the scarlet collar and cuffs introduced by King William IV in 1830. The traditional white facings were restored in 1843. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence