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Date > 1800 > 1840-1849 > 1843

Subject > Armed Forces

Organization > Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: End of a Long Reign

Type: Document

Wilfrid Laurier's penchant for compromise allowed him to remain in power for 15 years, earning him the nickname of the "Great Conciliator". But in 1911, this talent proved inadequate to the task of winning elections.

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors-Three Spheres of Influence

Type: Document

The governor’s influence extended locally, regionally and across the continent.

Site: Parks Canada

Coteau-du-Lac National Historic Site of Canada: The War of 1812

Type: Document

In 1812, the serious economic stakes of this embargo pushed the Americans to declare war against Great Britain. Although most battles took place in Upper Canada, the capture of Montréal remained a prime objective of the Americans, whose strategy rested on a two-pronged invasion via the Richelieu and the St. Lawrence Rivers. Coteau-du-Lac played a major role in defending the St. Lawrence and the border area.

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors-British Administration

Type: Document

In 1763, France lost Canada to England. Henceforth, British governors presided over the colony on behalf of the English king

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Location and Recognition- Background; Timeline

Type: Document

Founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, Quebec City was the capital of the French colony until 1759, when British troops conquered it. The city and the colony were brought into the British empire in 1763 by the treatise of Paris. Canada and the city of Quebec remained an English colony until the confederation of Canada in 1867

Site: Parks Canada