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Date > 1800 > 1840-1849 > 1842

Subject > Armed Forces

Resource Type > Image

23rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Welsh Fuziliers), 1838-1853

Type: Image

The 23rd Foot served in various places in Canada between 1838 and 1853. Its regimental mascot is a goat, a tradition that has since been adopted by its allied Canadian regiment, the Royal 22e Régiment. From left to right: a private, a pioneer, the drum-major and two officers. Note the traditional black silk ribbon worn at the back of the collar by the officers of this regiment. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Private, service dress, Colored Infantry Company, Upper Canada Incorporated Militia, 1843-1850

Type: Image

Raised in 1838, the Colored Infantry Company recruited from Blacks in Upper Canada was the only provincial unit on duty between 1843 the unit's disbanding in 1850. It served mainly along the American border in the Niagara area. Besides the service dress shown, these Black Canadian soldiers also had the shako and scarlet coat trimmed with white lace for full dress as in the British infantry. Reconstruction by Garth Dittrick. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Officer, 7th, or Queen’s Own Regiment of Hussars, 1842

Type: Image

The 7th Hussars was one of the few British cavalry regiments that served in Canada. It left Ireland in May 1838 and arrived at Montreal in June. In November 1838, it was deployed with other troops against the Patriotes in the Beauharnois area, near Montreal. The regiment remained at Montreal and Laprairie until 1843 when it went back to Britain. As can be seen in the illustration, hussar officers had a magnificent (and expensive) uniform that featured much gold lace and cords. The pelisse (the fur-trimmed jacket) of the 7th Hussars was blue until 1842 when it was changed to scarlet. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Sir George Augustus Wetherall (1788-1868)

Type: Image

Lieutenant-Colonel Wetherall, 1st, or The Royal Regiment of Foot, won the battle of St. Charles on 25 November 1837. This print shows him later in life, in the uniform of a British general. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

'Cat of nine tails' whip

Type: Image

The ‘cat of nine tails’ was a whip used to flog soldiers. This one was used in the British 83rd Regiment of Foot. The length of the wooden stick was 43cm (1' 5"), its tails 53cm (1' 9"), and it weighed 141,75 g. (5 ounces). (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

British Army folding iron barrack bed

Type: Image

This type of bed gradually replaced wooden double bunks from 1824. Every day, the bed was folded and the mattress rolled up for inspection. Army Circular Memorandum of 12 June 1860.

Site: National Defence

Royal Navy officers and midshipmen, 1830s-1890s

Type: Image

The two officers at left wear the scarlet collar and cuffs introduced by King William IV in 1830. The traditional white facings were restored in 1843. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Officer's jacket, Queen's Light Dragoons, 1838-1850

Type: Image

The Queen's Light Dragoons were a volunteer troop of cavalry raised in 1822 in Toronto (then called York) as the York Dragoons. In 1838, after service in the Upper Canada Rebellions, the unit was granted a new title as a reward for good service. At the same time, it adopted the style of uniform jacket shown in this photograph - dark blue with buff facings and silver lace. Worn with a Light Dragoon pattern shako, this uniform persisted to 1871, through a number of changes in regimental title and status. The unit is still active as The Governor General's Horse Guards. (Canadian War Museum)

Site: National Defence

Officer, Queen's Light Dragoon, 1838-1849

Type: Image

This light cavalry squadron was raised in Montreal by Captain Thomas Walter Jones in early December 1837. Forty-five volunteers from the unit were part of General Colborne's column at Saint-Eustache on 14 December 1837. Colborne kept the unit under arms throughout the remainder of the Rebellions, and they were presented with a guidon in April 1838. From 1839 until 1849, the Dragoons were stationed on the American frontier to intercept deserters. This contemporary print of an officer in full dress dates from this period. In 1849, when riots broke out in Montreal after the passage of the Rebellion Losses Bill, a detachment of the Queen’s Light Dragoons protected Governor General Lord Elgin from injury at the hands of stone-throwing rioters. (Library and Archives Canada, C-040835)

Site: National Defence