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Date > 1800

Subject > Wars, Battles and Conflicts > British Colonial Period, 1760-1867

Organization > Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Upper Canada, the Maritimes and the War of 1812 - Introduction to Traitors and Heroes - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

A description of the ambivalent attitude of the Maritimes and Upper Canada towards the war against the Americans in this excerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History." Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Battle of Saint-Denis - Rebellion and Reform

Type: Document

Describes the battle of Saint-Denis between British soldiers and "les Patriotes" of Lower Canada. This confrontation marked the beginning of civil war in Canada. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Attack on Fort Detroit, War of 1812 - The Detroit Bluff - Isaac Brock - A Question of Loyalties

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

From the television series "Canada: A People's History", a description of Brigadier-General Isaac Brock's attack on Fort Detroit, an offense which relied heavily on bluff. General William Hull surrendered the fort without a fight. Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Introduction to Battle of Châteauguay - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

This exerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History" describes the Battle of Châteaugay during the War of 1812, when Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Michel de Salaberry held off the American invaders on the banks of the Châteaugay River in October 1813. Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Conquered and the Conquerors - British Control of Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

After the conquest, a new Canada slowly took shape. The Canadian militia returned to their villages and farms. 500 French soldiers, married to Canadian women, were allowed to stay. 3000 British troops remained in Quebec. Bigot was put in the Bastille for corruption, and died in exile in 1778. Governor Vaudreuil was arrested for his role in the colony's loss. General James Wolfe became a virtual industry in death, as biographies, ballads, epic poems, and paintings of him abounded. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Isaac Brock - Introduction - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

By 1811, Britain's obsession with making war on France was making a dangerous enemy of the United States. Some Congressmen called for war; they knew they couldn't attack Britain directly but they could threaten her colonies. Upper Canada was vulnerable, especially at Niagara and along the Detroit frontier. To Isaac Brock, Brigadier-General of the British forces in Upper Canada, the warning signs were ominous. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Violence in Lower Canada's Countryside - Rebellion and Reform

Type: Document

Information about the activities of 'Patriotes' which took place in the County of Two Mountains and in the Richelieu Valley of Lower Canada. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Battle of Saint-Charles - Rebellion and Reform

Type: Document

British troops killed 150 Patriotes and dealt a severe blow to the Lower Canada rebels at the Battle of Saint-Charles in the Richelieu Valley on November 25, 1837. This excerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History" discusses the battle and the effect it had on the Patriote rebellion. Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Americans Invade Upper Canada in the War of 1812 - Introduction to Americans Strike Back - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

On October 13, 1812, the garrison at Fort George, on the Niagara River, was awakened by the thunder of heavy guns. Across the river on the American side, Major John Lovett at Fort Grey was doing his best to pound the British defenses to pieces. Their national honour had been shaken by the taking of Detroit two months earlier and now the Americans were responding. This was a full-scale invasion of Upper Canada. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

U.S. Declares War on Canada - Isaac Brock - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

On June 18, 1812, American President James Madison signed a declaration of war against Britain. Brigadier-General Isaac Brock heard the news while he was dining with American officers at Fort George. They finished the dinner in peace then withdrew to plan mutual destruction. Rather than spread his unreliable force in a thin, defensive pattern, Brock chose to assemble them and mount an audacious offensive. His target was Fort Detroit. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation