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Officer with regimental colour, 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot, 1814

Type: Image

The 1st battalion of the 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot was sent from the Duke of Wellington's victorious army in Spain to serve in Canada during 1814-1815. This was not the first time in the country for the regiment, which had been part of Burgoyne's army during the American Revolutionary War. This contemporary illustration shows an officer with the regimental colour (in the regiment's yellow facing colour). The 183 centimetre square colour itself is partially furled to make it easier to carry. Accompanying the officer is a colour-sergeant armed with a spontoon. The rank was created in 1813 as the senior non-commissioned officer in an infantry company. These men had a special duty of protecting the colours in action, and were distinguished with a special rank badge worn on the right arm.

Site: National Defence

Iroquois Terrorize Americans Into Surrender

Type: Document

Warned by Laura Secord, British Lieutenant Fitzgibbon ordered that the Americans be ambushed by a body of Iroquois warriors. While fewer in number, the Amerindians scared the Americans so much that the invaders surrendered with relief when FitzGibbon's British troops finally arrived.

Site: National Defence

King's and Regimental Colours, 41st Regiment of Foot, 1802-1815

Type: Image

All regular regiments of infantry (or 'foot') in the British army during the War of 1812 had two colours. The King's colour was blue with the red and white crosses of St. George, St. Patrick and St. Andrew superimposed. This was the 'union flag', carried after Ireland was joined to Great Britain in 1801. The second (or 'regimental') colour was usually in same colour as a unit's facings, but regiments with red (like the 41st), white or black facings carried a white flag with a red cross of St. George. In the corner (or 'canton') was a small depiction of the union flag. The regiment's name ('XLI REGT.' here) was displayed in the centre, often within a wreath of roses (for England), thistles (for Scotland) and shamrocks (for Ireland). Surviving records show that the 41st received colours of the new pattern in 1802, which they carried until a new set were provided in 1815. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence