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Date > 1800

Subject > Armed Forces > Military Ceremony and Honours

Resource Type > Image

Officer with regimental colour, 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot, 1814

Type: Image

The 1st battalion of the 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot was sent from the Duke of Wellington's victorious army in Spain to serve in Canada during 1814-1815. This was not the first time in the country for the regiment, which had been part of Burgoyne's army during the American Revolutionary War. This contemporary illustration shows an officer with the regimental colour (in the regiment's yellow facing colour). The 183 centimetre square colour itself is partially furled to make it easier to carry. Accompanying the officer is a colour-sergeant armed with a spontoon. The rank was created in 1813 as the senior non-commissioned officer in an infantry company. These men had a special duty of protecting the colours in action, and were distinguished with a special rank badge worn on the right arm.

Site: National Defence

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Sir James Henry Craig, Governor General of Canada

Type: Image

Craig (1748-1812), was Governor General of Canada from 1807 to 1811. His term was a stormy one, but he had many friends and admirerers in the colony, something shown by the brisk sale in Canada of prints portraying him. Sir James is shown wearing the uniform of a British general, with the star of the Order of the Bath on his breast. (Library and Archives Canada, C-024888)

Site: National Defence

Lieutenant-Colonel Charles-Michel d'Irumberry de Salaberry, Canadian Voltigeurs, circa 1813-1815

Type: Image

De Salaberry (1778-1829) was a veteran officer of the British army, with service in the West Indies and the Netherlands. He belonged to one of the most influential families in French Canada. The family enjoyed a long-standing friendship with Prince Edward Augustus, the Duke of Kent and future King William IV. The prince's influence got the young Canadian his first commission, with the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot. De Salaberry raised the Provincial Corps of Light Infantry (Canadian Voltigeurs) in 1812 and won lasting fame in Canada when 300-400 of his troops defeated an American army of over 5,000 men at Châteauguay on 26 November 1813. This engraving, made after the War of 1812, shows de Salaberry in the uniform of an officer of the Canadian Voltigeurs. The circular medal he wears is the Field Officers Gold Medal, a very rare award at the time. This medal of de Salaberry's is in the collection of the Canadian War Museum today. (Library and Archives Canada, C-009226)

Site: National Defence

Soldier’s shoulder belt-plate of the Royal Canadian Volunteers, 1795-1802

Type: Image

This oval brass belt-plate is the pattern issued to the Royal Canadian Volunteers. This two battalion British regular regiment was raised in Canada, and existed between 1795 and 1802. These belt-plates were used to link the two leather belts worn by British soldiers at this time, and most units had a style of plate that was particular to them. In this case, the design is fairly simple - the 'GR' cypher of King George III of Great Britain, surrounded by the unit's title 'ROYAL CANADIAN VOLUNTEER BATTN'. Portraits of the regiment’s officers show that they did not use this pattern of belt-plate, having at least two different versions of their own. (Private collection)

Site: National Defence

Pehriska-Ruhpa, Moennitari (or Hidatsa) Warrior in the Costume of the Dog Dance

Type: Image

Pehriska-Ruhpa was a Moennitari (or Hidatsa) leader, whom artist Karl Bodmer and Prince Maximilian of Wied met when they stayed at Fort Clark in the winter of 1834. Bodmer painted a watercolor sketch of Pehriska-Ruhpa in his Dog Dance clothing, then at a later time prepared the image for engraving and posed the figure to show a dance posture.

Site: National Defence

King's and Regimental Colours, 41st Regiment of Foot, 1802-1815

Type: Image

All regular regiments of infantry (or 'foot') in the British army during the War of 1812 had two colours. The King's colour was blue with the red and white crosses of St. George, St. Patrick and St. Andrew superimposed. This was the 'union flag', carried after Ireland was joined to Great Britain in 1801. The second (or 'regimental') colour was usually in same colour as a unit's facings, but regiments with red (like the 41st), white or black facings carried a white flag with a red cross of St. George. In the corner (or 'canton') was a small depiction of the union flag. The regiment's name ('XLI REGT.' here) was displayed in the centre, often within a wreath of roses (for England), thistles (for Scotland) and shamrocks (for Ireland). Surviving records show that the 41st received colours of the new pattern in 1802, which they carried until a new set were provided in 1815. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence