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Date > 1800

Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life > Health, Medical Care and Nutrition

This Week in History: Archives: Patients and Devotion: Georgina Fane Pope

Type: Document

In January of 1998, Parks Canada introduced a weekly Web Site named This Week in History, which presents a variety of events that have shaped Canada’s past, present and future. These short texts are summaries, not complete histories, meant to entice the reader to explore Canadian history. Search by keyword or by title.

Site: Parks Canada

Canadian Illustrated News - Hospital Ward in the Palace at Versailles (The War)

Type: Image

Drawing of a hospital room in the Palace at Versailles during the Franco-Prussian War.

Site: Library and Archives Canada

Holding Up Half the Sky: Women's History Lesson Plan

Type: Document

"Women hold up half the sky" is a saying that values the contributions of women to our world. This activity introduces some of Canada's remarkable female "agents of change" and the organizations with which they worked.

Site: Parks Canada

Meals

Type: Document

British army rations during the 18th and 19th centuries were dull but adequate. Each day, a man got 1 pound (489 g) of bread or flour, 1 pound of beef (or ½ pound of salt pork), a little butter and cheese and a pint (0.568 l) of beer. Vegetables or other items had to be bought by the soldier.

Site: National Defence

Drink and Women

Type: Document

Alcohol was the only escape from a highly regulated life for many British soldiers during the 18th and 19th centuries. As a result, drunkenness and alcoholism were common. With roughly 90% of the men bachelors, prostitution and venereal disease were also big problems.

Site: National Defence

Who Will Remember Us? Commemorating the Historic Achievements of Women in Atlantic Canada: Lesson Plan

Type: Document

The following activities are intended for use in conjunction with the Who Will Remember Us? booklet, which outlines the contributions that women and women’s organizations have made in Atlantic Canada.

Site: Parks Canada

Officers in the mess, circa 1850

Type: Image

The regimental officers' mess was something of a social centre and a military version of a private gentlemen’s club. By pooling their resources together, the officers could thus indulge in some of life's small luxuries such as good wines and pleasant surroundings.

Site: National Defence

Discipline and Punishment

Type: Document

During the 18th and 19th centuries, even small crimes were mercilessly punished in the British army. Floggings were frequent, and punishment was performed in public as an example to fellow soldiers. Other punishments included prison, hard labour, branding and death.

Site: National Defence

Nursing Sister Georgina Fane Pope (1862-1938) - South African War

Type: Document

Georgina Pope served at British hospitals just north of Cape Town, South Africa, as senior sister in 1899. In 1908 she attained the position of matron, first in the history of Canadian Army Medical Corps.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Staff and patients, Moose Jaw field hospital, 1885

Type: Image

A group of Anglican nuns from Toronto served in a 40-bed hospital in Moose Jaw during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885. They cared for sick and wounded from the battles of Batoche and Fish Creek. Twelve women in all were part of the first organized body of female nurses in Canadian military history. Note the group of wounded patients at centre, two of whom have lost an arm.

Site: National Defence