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Date > 1700 > 1740-1749

Subject > Politics and Society > War Art, Literature and Music > Paintings and Drawings

Private, 40th Regiment of Foot, circa 1745

Type: Image

The 40th was the longtime British garrison in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. For ordinary service, English soldiers wore brown gaiters instead of white, which easily got dirty. When the weather was chilly, they unhooked the turnbacks of their coats to cover their thighs and buttoned the lapels across the chest. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Soldier, Compagnies franches de la Marine, New France, circa 1740

Type: Image

This man wears the grey-white coat of France with the blue facings of the Troupes de la Marine. He is armed with a musket, sword and bayonet. Note the anchor decorating his cartridge pouch. This was appropriate given that these troops belonged to the Ministère de la Marine, which was responsible for the navy as well as for France's colonies. This is how the men of the Compagnies franches would appear on parade or in garrison in one of the larger forts. Reconstruction by Michel Pétard. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Frigate under construction, around the mid-eighteenth century

Type: Image

This contemporary print show the hull of a frigate being covered with planks. To form the skin of the hull, shaped planks are being made and then attached to the ship's ribs. Note the finished plank being hoisted into place by a derrick at centre. (Museo Naval, Madrid)

Site: National Defence

Micmac chief, circa 1740

Type: Image

This Micmac leader wears a mixture of Amerindian and European dress. Gifts of military clothing equipment were often made by the French colonial authories to allied leaders. Note the gorget around this man's neck - this small piece of armour was the symbol of an officer in European military fashion. Reconstruction by Francis Back. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Louis XV, King of France from 1715 to 1774

Type: Image

King Louis XV of France (1710–1774) is shown wearing the royal robes. Around his neck are the collars and insignia of two orders of chivalry - the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece, and the French Order of Saint-Louis. The white 8-pointed cross of the latter order was awarded to many Canadain soldiers during the French regime in Canada. (Library and Archives Canada, C-000604)

Site: National Defence

Canadian militiamen, first half of the 18th century

Type: Image

These men show the sort of clothing that Canadian militiamen would have worn on service during the first half of the 18th century. At centre is a Militia captain, identified by the sword he carries and the gilt gorget he wears around his neck. This officer is also equipped to fight, with a powder horn and musket. The other three figures are common soldiers, armed with muskets and wearing the style of coat known as a capot. Reconstruction by Francis Back. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Men of the Compagnie des canonniers-bombardiers du Canada move an artillery piece into place

Type: Image

Shown are various ranks of the Canonniers-bombardiers during the mid-eighteenth century. The men serving the cannon are wearing their waistcoats so that they will not be hampered by their coats and equipment. Sergeants and corporals can be recognized by the silver lace stitched to their cuffs, double lace for the former and single lace for the latter. The drummers are wearing the King's livery with buttons of white metal. The officers' uniforms are identical to those of their men, but of better quality. Reconstruction by Eugène Lelièpvre.

Site: National Defence

Amerindian warriors, first half of the 18th century

Type: Image

These Amerindian warriors show some of the variations of appearance to be seen in the first half of the 18th century. Despite their adoption of many European weapons and articles of clothing, the first nations preserved a resolutely Amerindian look by integrating all this with their tattoos and body paint. The central figure is a chief. Reconstruction by David Rickman. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Navy archer, mid-18th century

Type: Image

Not to be confused with the archers of the Maréchaussée, Navy archers were escorts, bodyguards and armed agents of the Intendant, the chief financial administrator of a French province or colony. They arrived in New France when the first Intendant was appointed in 1665. Reconstruction by Francis Back. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence