History Browser

Search Results

Date > 1700 > 1730-1739

Subject > Politics and Society > War Art, Literature and Music > Paintings and Drawings

Frigate under construction, around the mid-eighteenth century

Type: Image

This contemporary print show the hull of a frigate being covered with planks. To form the skin of the hull, shaped planks are being made and then attached to the ship's ribs. Note the finished plank being hoisted into place by a derrick at centre. (Museo Naval, Madrid)

Site: National Defence

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Louis XV, King of France from 1715 to 1774

Type: Image

King Louis XV of France (1710–1774) is shown wearing the royal robes. Around his neck are the collars and insignia of two orders of chivalry - the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece, and the French Order of Saint-Louis. The white 8-pointed cross of the latter order was awarded to many Canadain soldiers during the French regime in Canada. (Library and Archives Canada, C-000604)

Site: National Defence

Canadian militiamen, first half of the 18th century

Type: Image

These men show the sort of clothing that Canadian militiamen would have worn on service during the first half of the 18th century. At centre is a Militia captain, identified by the sword he carries and the gilt gorget he wears around his neck. This officer is also equipped to fight, with a powder horn and musket. The other three figures are common soldiers, armed with muskets and wearing the style of coat known as a capot. Reconstruction by Francis Back. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Officer, Compagnies franches de la Marine, New France, circa 1735

Type: Image

After 1732, officers in Canada officially adopted uniforms. Before that time, their dress was subject only to fashion and the wishes of their commanding officer. This man's gorget (a small piece of throat armour worn when on duty) and half-pike mark him out as an officer. Reconstruction by Michel Pétard. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Amerindian warriors, first half of the 18th century

Type: Image

These Amerindian warriors show some of the variations of appearance to be seen in the first half of the 18th century. Despite their adoption of many European weapons and articles of clothing, the first nations preserved a resolutely Amerindian look by integrating all this with their tattoos and body paint. The central figure is a chief. Reconstruction by David Rickman. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Charles Le Moyne de Longueuil, second baron de Longeuil, circa 1750

Type: Image

Le Moyne de Longueuil (1687-1755) served in the garrison of New France for many years as part of the Monteal general staff. In 1739-1740, he commanded the Canadian expedition which fought the Chickasaws in Louisiana.

Site: National Defence

Careening in the mid-eighteenth century

Type: Image

After several months at sea, ships' hulls became encrusted with small mollusks and worms, damaging them and slowing down the ships. Ships then had to be careened. This long and tedious operation, done at the naval yards of Quebec City and Louisbourg, consisted of inclining the ship and 'heating' its hull, that is, burning the crust off the planks with torches. (Museo Naval, Madrid)

Site: National Defence

Sergeant and private soldier, régiment suisse de Karrer, circa 1732

Type: Image

Sergeants of this Swiss mercenary unit in French service carried halberds and had silver lace on their cuffs as a rank badge. Until the early 1730s, they also had a red plume border edging the brim of their hat. Reconstruction by Eugène Lelièpvre. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Interior view of the Navy warehouses, around the mid­eighteenth century

Type: Image

This mid-18th century Spanish print gives an impression of the sort of storehouses that were necessary to support the building of warships, such as took place at Quebec between 1739 and 1759. Similar facilities would have existed at Louisbourg to supply the needs of French warships stationed there. (Museo Naval, Madrid)

Site: National Defence