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Date > 1700 > 1720-1729

Subject > Politics and Society > War Art, Literature and Music > Paintings and Drawings

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Louis XV, King of France from 1715 to 1774

Type: Image

King Louis XV of France (1710–1774) is shown wearing the royal robes. Around his neck are the collars and insignia of two orders of chivalry - the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece, and the French Order of Saint-Louis. The white 8-pointed cross of the latter order was awarded to many Canadain soldiers during the French regime in Canada. (Library and Archives Canada, C-000604)

Site: National Defence

Canadian militiamen, first half of the 18th century

Type: Image

These men show the sort of clothing that Canadian militiamen would have worn on service during the first half of the 18th century. At centre is a Militia captain, identified by the sword he carries and the gilt gorget he wears around his neck. This officer is also equipped to fight, with a powder horn and musket. The other three figures are common soldiers, armed with muskets and wearing the style of coat known as a capot. Reconstruction by Francis Back. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Melchior de Jordy de Cabanac (1666-1726)

Type: Image

De Jordy de Cabanac was an officer in the Compagnies franches de la Marine. This painting shows him as he would have appeared around 1720, wearing the white cross that marks him as a member of the Royal and Military Order of Saint Louis. (Library and Archives Canada C-010540)

Site: National Defence

Amerindian warriors, first half of the 18th century

Type: Image

These Amerindian warriors show some of the variations of appearance to be seen in the first half of the 18th century. Despite their adoption of many European weapons and articles of clothing, the first nations preserved a resolutely Amerindian look by integrating all this with their tattoos and body paint. The central figure is a chief. Reconstruction by David Rickman. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Philippe de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, Marquis de Vaudreuil; Governor General of New France 1703 to 1725

Type: Image

The Marquis de Vaudreuil was a former officer of the régiment des Mousquetaires in the royal guard of the King of France. Appointed Governor General of New France in 1703, Philippe de Rigauld de Vaudreuil (circa 1643 – 1725) ably organized the defence of Canada with slim resources during the War of Spanish Succession (or 'Queen Anne’s war'). From 1713 until his death in 1725, he consolidated the French territorial gains in the Great Lakes and upper Mississippi. In 1742, de Vaudreuil's son Pierre de Rigauld de Vaudreuil de Cavagnial, Marquis de Vaudreuil, followed in his father's footsteps and became the only Canadian-born Governor General of New France. (Library and Archives Canada C-010614)

Site: National Defence

Louis-Philippe de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, Marquis de Vaudreuil

Type: Image

The eldest son of the Governor General of New France, de Rigaud de Vaudreuil (1691­1763) distinguished himself commanding warships in the Marine royale française. The portrait does not show the subject wearing the characteristic white cross of the Order of Saint-Louis, which means it probably predates 1721, when he was made a member. (Library and Archives Canada, C-010612)

Site: National Defence

Drummer, Compagnies franches de la Marine, New France, 1716-1730

Type: Image

This drummer wears the livery of the King of France. His clothing style dates him between 1716 and 1730. Reconstruction by Michel Pétard. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Soldier, régiment suisse de Karrer, circa 1725

Type: Image

Swiss and Irish troops in French service generally wore red uniforms. When the régiment suisse de Karrer was raised for service in the French colonies by the Ministère de la Marine in 1719, it followed this tradition. This is the uniform worn by the unit when it was first posted to Louisbourg in 1722. Reconstruction by Michel Pétard. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

French flags, circa 1690

Type: Image

This 17th century illustration shows four French flags that would be seen at sea and on land. At upper left is the solid white flag used by the French crown (and hence by the French army and navy). At upper and lower right are two variations on the blue and white flag that was ordered for the French merchant navy in 1661. The white pennant seen in the lower left was used to help distinguish different squadrons in a French fleet. Each would fly this pennant on a different mast. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence