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Date > 1600 > 1680-1689 > 1683

Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Equipment, Materials and Infrastructure

To the Sound of the Drummer's Beat

Type: Document

Fortified towns like Quebec, Montreal, Trois-Rivières and Louisbourg were all governed by military staffs. The lives of French soldiers and Canadian civilians alike were regulated by the different drum beatings of the garrison, from La Diane at dawn to La Retraite at sunset.

Site: National Defence

'Cat of nine tails' whip

Type: Image

The ‘cat of nine tails’ was a whip used to flog soldiers. This one was used in the British 83rd Regiment of Foot. The length of the wooden stick was 43cm (1' 5"), its tails 53cm (1' 9"), and it weighed 141,75 g. (5 ounces). (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Structure and Organization of Forts & Chateaux- Four Forts

Type: Document

The Saint-Louis forts and châteaux site is complex. It consists of three elements: the forts, châteaux and gardens. There were a total of four forts and two Châteaux

Site: Parks Canada

The Military Shift Westwards

Type: Document

By the end of the 17th Century, Montreal had replaced Quebec as the military centre of Canada. At the hub of several inland waterways, it became the centre of a military expansion west and south. A series of forts were built on the Great Lakes to protect French interests.

Site: National Defence

Life in Forts and Trading Posts

Type: Document

Outside the St. Lawrence Valley, in the more distant forts and trading posts, the accommodations of the soldiers could be very rudimentary. The situation improved over the years, however, especially in the larger forts built in the eighteenth century.

Site: National Defence

Desertion

Type: Document

Desertion to the king's enemies was considered the most serious crime a soldier could commit. It did take place in New France, but at a much lower rate than in Europe because of the difficulties posed by the country separating New France from the British colonies

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Location and Recognition- Background; Timeline

Type: Document

Founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, Quebec City was the capital of the French colony until 1759, when British troops conquered it. The city and the colony were brought into the British empire in 1763 by the treatise of Paris. Canada and the city of Quebec remained an English colony until the confederation of Canada in 1867

Site: Parks Canada

Irregular Soldiers And Hardened Voyageurs

Type: Document

French colonists in Canada were skilled at shooting and using canoes and snowshoes to travel great distances. These skills were useful for mounting military raids. The Canadians were reluctant to fight in the militia during the 1670s, but became more enthusiastic when war with the Iroquois resumed.

Site: National Defence

The Cooking Pot

Type: Document

Soldiers of the Troupes de la Marine were divided into groups of seven for meals. Each 'plat' would have its own iron cooking pot and ladle. Food would be eaten out of the common pot.

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Structure and Organization of Forts & Châteaux - Two Châteaux

Type: Document

The Saint-Louis forts and châteaux site is complex. It consists of three elements: the forts, châteaux and gardens. There were a total of four forts and two Châteaux.

Site: Parks Canada