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The battle of Long-Sault, in May 1660

Type: Image

This early-20th century engraving shows the climax of the legendary 1660 defence of Long-Sault against the Iroquois by Adam Dollard des Ormeaux and his men. One of the French defenders is shown holding a keg of gunpowder above his head. This makeshift bomb would fall back inside the fort and kill much of the garrison.

Site: National Defence

Another Round Of Iroquois Wars

Type: Document

The Iroquois pressed their advantage, raiding and spreading fear among the colonists. A French attempt to force a pitched battle was unsuccessful.

Site: National Defence

Iroquois warriors lurking near French settlements during the 1650s

Type: Image

Until the 1660s, especially in the Montreal area, no one in the French settlements really felt quite safe from surprise attacks by hostile Iroquois warriors. Many Canadian settlers, including women, learned to handle firearms during the 1650s.

Site: National Defence

Dollard's Expedition Surprised

Type: Document

A party of men under Dollard des Ormeaux, commander of the Montreal garrison, was surprised by a much larger group of Iroquois. Besieged at a disused Algonquin fort at Long-Sault on the Ottawa River, the Frenchmen and their Huron allies were wiped out.

Site: National Defence

Amerindian Battle Customs

Type: Document

As often happened after a battle, the Iroquois returned home, despite having suffered few casualties. Later accounts that attributed this to Dollard's heroism misunderstood the way Amerindians conducted wars.

Site: National Defence

War and the Foundation of Canada - New France And The Iroquois Wars

Type: Document

Samuel de Champlain shot and killed two Iroquois chiefs in 1609 at Ticonderoga. This set off a long, bitter war between the French colonists and the Iroquois Confederacy.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War and the Foundation of Canada - New France’s Militarized Society

Type: Document

From 1650 to 1760, French settlements in Québec City, Montréal, and Trois-Rivières created a society organized for war. Under the order of Louis XIV, King of France, every man underwent mandatory military training. Supported by allies of the First Peoples and a small garrison of professional soldiers, the Canadien militia formed the backbone of the colony’s military forces until the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763).

Site: Canadian War Museum