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The French And British Navies

Type: Document

Both Britain and France needed strong navies to protect their coasts, fishing fleets and colonies. The peak of French naval power was during the 1690s, when it dominated the coasts of England. Defeated in 1692, the French navy declined in quality and strength from that point on.

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors-Three Spheres of Influence

Type: Document

The governor’s influence extended locally, regionally and across the continent.

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Govenors at Work and Leisure - Bit of History

Type: Document

...the château was also the governor’s residence, it was an important living environment and cultural centre. There were many receptions, under both the French and English regimes.

Site: Parks Canada

Pay

Type: Document

A soldier's pay was never high, and very seldom adjusted as the cost of living increased. From 1797 to 1867, the rate was a shilling (12 pence) a day, from which deductions were made for food, clothing and other expenses. Little money would be left to spend as a man wished.

Site: National Defence

War and the Foundation of Canada - Clash Of Empires

Type: Document

Eventually war erupted in North America between competing English and French colonies during the 17th century. In 1713, France ceded much of Acadia (now New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island) to Britain and abandoned its claims to Newfoundland. They retained control of Cape Breton, where they built the fortress of Louisburg to protect their fishing and shipping interests.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Archaeological Discoveries

Type: Document

The archeological research project currently underway at the Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada began in June 2005. The final exploratory campaign was conducted in the summer of 2007. The three digs confirmed the site’s historical significance. Many architectural remains were excavated:

Site: Parks Canada

The Military Wedding

Type: Document

During the 18th and 19th centuries, marriage for the common British soldier was governed mostly by custom. Marriage involved 'leaping over the sword', where bride and groom did just that in the presence of the man's companions. Official permission was needed in theory, but seldom given.

Site: National Defence

'Cat of nine tails' whip

Type: Image

The ‘cat of nine tails’ was a whip used to flog soldiers. This one was used in the British 83rd Regiment of Foot. The length of the wooden stick was 43cm (1' 5"), its tails 53cm (1' 9"), and it weighed 141,75 g. (5 ounces). (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Structure and Organization of Forts & Chateaux- Four Forts

Type: Document

The Saint-Louis forts and châteaux site is complex. It consists of three elements: the forts, châteaux and gardens. There were a total of four forts and two Châteaux

Site: Parks Canada

Soldiers' Wives

Type: Document

As units moved from posting to posting within the British empire during the 18th and 19th centuries, some soldier's wives (up to 6 per company) were transported with their husbands at government expense. Before each move, a lottery was held. Losers were abandoned without support.

Site: National Defence