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Date > 1600 > 1600-1609

Subject > Soldiers, Warriors and Leaders > Population Groups

Champlain's famous fight on 30 July 1609 against the Iroquois Indians as interpreted in a late 19th century print

Type: Image

When Champlain took part in a 1609 Huron expedition against the Iroquois, he began a contest between two ways of warfare that lasted centuries. The combination of armour and firearms was rapidly understood and used to advantage by early French soldiers in Canada. By contrast, the Amerindians evolved furtive tactics and rapid movements which eventually proved to be the best in a wilderness environment.

Site: National Defence

Canada's First Warriors

Type: Interactive ResourceDocument

A slide show presentation of Native American dress from the 16th to mid-18th century.

Site: National Defence

French soldiers of the early 17th century

Type: Image

These French soldiers wear a style of clothing common through much of Western Europe in the early seventeenth century. Note the musket rest carried by the man at left, and the pike carried by the man in the background. Mid-19th century engraving after a drawing by Alfred de Marbot.

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors-Three Spheres of Influence

Type: Document

The governor’s influence extended locally, regionally and across the continent.

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors- French Administration

Type: Document

The governor represented the king of France in the colony. From 1608, when Quebec was founded, until 1663, the governor held virtually all powers: military command, civil management, and execution of royal decrees.In 1663, things began to change: the king of France took direct control of the colony and installed a true colonial government

Site: Parks Canada

The European Failure

Type: Document

Unlike the Spanish Central America, Europeans were unable to successfully colonize North America in the 16th Century. Amerindian guerrilla tactics combined with a cold and hostile land to frustrate the newcomers. Nevertheless, North America became a theatre of war for European conflicts.

Site: National Defence

Records of the 4th International Colloquy on Military History (Ottawa 23.25 VIII 1978) Date of Publication: 1979

Type: Document

Introduction by W.A.B. Douglas, Director Directorate of History, Program Chairman. Articles in a variety of languages including: English, German, French, Italian, Portugese, Spanish, Russian, Greek.

Site: National Defence

War and the Foundation of Canada - Clash Of Empires

Type: Document

Eventually war erupted in North America between competing English and French colonies during the 17th century. In 1713, France ceded much of Acadia (now New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island) to Britain and abandoned its claims to Newfoundland. They retained control of Cape Breton, where they built the fortress of Louisburg to protect their fishing and shipping interests.

Site: Canadian War Museum

A Commemorative History of Aboriginal People in the Canadian Military

Type: Document

This history on our Aboriginal Peoples and their contribution to Canada’s rich military heritage is the latest in a series of books prepared by the Director of History and Heritage commemorating especial military experience. Authors : P. Whitney Lackenbauer, Ph.D., R. Scott Sheffield, Ph.D., John Moses, Maxime Gohier

Site: National Defence

Port-Royal National Historic Site of Canada: As Seen Through Your Eyes: Lesson Plan

Type: Document

What was life like in Port-Royal, Acadia, and what was the significance of the success of this small colony? This learning activity offers the opportunity to explore the trials and successes of this small group of French colonists from the perspective of one of its members.

Site: Parks Canada