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Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Fortified Sites

Date > 1800 > 1860-1869

British iron guns mounted on iron carriages, circa 1815

Type: Image

Iron carriages were introduced in the British artillery in 1810. They were to be placed ‘in such parts of fortifications as are least exposed to the enemy’s fire’ as it was feared they would shatter if hit by enemy artillery. The examples seen in this photograph are found at the Fortifications of Quebec National Historic Site.

Site: National Defence

Map of Halifax, 1865

Type: Image

Starting in the late 1820s, the fortifications of Halifax were developed into a formidable defence complex. The new Citadel on the hill dominated the city’s landscape with batteries dotting the coast to provide crossfire against enemy ships. George’s Island was also heavily fortified to block the passage leading into Bedford basin. This 1865 map of Halifax shows these defences were woven into the layout of the city. (Library and Archives Canada, NMC 48125-6/6)

Site: National Defence

The Military Art of the American Northwest

Type: Document

War in the Pacific Northwest centred around the canoe, which could be up to 20 metres long. Flotillas of canoes would attack enemy villages, hoping to capture prisoners to keep as slaves. Coastal forts of cedar logs were to be found, used to help control and tax maritime trade.

Site: National Defence

British at Fort Chambly

Type: Document

After the Conquest in 1760, the British moved into Fort Chambly. This website describes the role of the fort during the invasion of Canada by the Americans in 1775-1776 and again in the War of 1812.

Site: Parks Canada

History of Fort Wellington National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

This web page is devoted to the history of Fort Wellington from its construction as a defensive fortification on the St. Lawrence River to its designation as a National Historic Site in 1925.

Site: Parks Canada

The Budding Explorer: Samuel de Champlain: Activity

Type: Interactive Resource

Help the ghost of Samuel de Champlain regain his memory of Canada`s national historic sites in an interactive game for younger children.

Site: Parks Canada

Aerial view of Fort Lennox

Type: Image

Fort Lennox was built on Isle-au-Noix just north of the American border between 1819 to 1826. Its purpose was to block the way towards Montreal to any hostile force coming up the Richelieu River from Lake Champlain. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

York Factory National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

Visitors to York Factory National Historic Site of Canada can experience the diverse history of the Hudson's Bay Company and the fur trade of the 1600-1800s.

Site: Parks Canada

Carleton Martello Tower National Historic Site of Canada: The War of 1812

Type: Document

It is June of 1812, and the United States has declared war on Great Britain! Tension has been simmering between these two nations for many years and for many reasons.

Site: Parks Canada

St. Andrews Blockhouse National Historic Site of Canada: Military Services

Type: Document

After the war ended in 1814, St. Andrews Blockhouse continued to be used as a barracks by the Royal Artillery.

Site: Parks Canada