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Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Fortified Sites

Date > 1800 > 1810-1819

British iron guns mounted on iron carriages, circa 1815

Type: Image

Iron carriages were introduced in the British artillery in 1810. They were to be placed ‘in such parts of fortifications as are least exposed to the enemy’s fire’ as it was feared they would shatter if hit by enemy artillery. The examples seen in this photograph are found at the Fortifications of Quebec National Historic Site.

Site: National Defence

The Military Art of the American Northwest

Type: Document

War in the Pacific Northwest centred around the canoe, which could be up to 20 metres long. Flotillas of canoes would attack enemy villages, hoping to capture prisoners to keep as slaves. Coastal forts of cedar logs were to be found, used to help control and tax maritime trade.

Site: National Defence

American Withdrawal Leaves Towns Burning

Type: Document

When the British regained control of Lake Ontario in December 1813, the Americans had to move men to hold their shipyards at Sackets Harbor. Unable to hold Fort George, they burnt both it and the surrounding towns in mid-winter. A unit of Canadian traitors helped them in this cruelty.

Site: National Defence

British at Fort Chambly

Type: Document

After the Conquest in 1760, the British moved into Fort Chambly. This website describes the role of the fort during the invasion of Canada by the Americans in 1775-1776 and again in the War of 1812.

Site: Parks Canada

St. Andrews Blockhouse National Historic Site of Canada: The War of 1812

Type: Document

It is June of 1812, and war has been declared between the United States and Great Britain! Tension has been simmering between these two nations for many years and for many reasons.

Site: Parks Canada

Fort Montgomery - the American fort built inside Canada

Type: Image

The United States Corps of Engineers began building Fort Montgomery in 1816, after the War of 1812. It was sited near Rouses Point, New York, at the northern end of Lake Champlain at the mouth of the Richelieu River. In the case of another war, it was to guard the northern American border against British and Canadian incursions and provide a base for United States armies invading Canada in that area. However, construction had to be abandoned after two years when the fort was found to be slightly inside Canada’s boundaries. Fort Montgomery got the nickname ‘Fort Blunder’ and was never completed. The site later reverted to the United States in 1842 as a good will gesture between Britain, Canada and the United States, nations that have since been allies in the great struggles of the 20th century.

Site: National Defence

War of 1812 - Teacher's Resource - Fort George National Historic Site

Type: Document

Lesson plan for teaching the history of the War of 1812 that includes time lines and synopses of major events compiled from several texts with the intent of creating a good historical foundation (especially for those with little background on the subject). The material is divided into five major sections - Loyalists; The onset of war; The war turns; The US returns to Niagara; The war ends.

Site: Parks Canada

1814 Time Lines

Type: Document

While it is called the War of 1812, many battles, raids, and skirmishes occurred in 1814. This time-line presents a brief description of the events of 1814 and the forces that were involved in both land and sea confrontations.

Site: Parks Canada

History of Fort Wellington National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

This web page is devoted to the history of Fort Wellington from its construction as a defensive fortification on the St. Lawrence River to its designation as a National Historic Site in 1925.

Site: Parks Canada

The Budding Explorer: Samuel de Champlain: Activity

Type: Interactive Resource

Help the ghost of Samuel de Champlain regain his memory of Canada`s national historic sites in an interactive game for younger children.

Site: Parks Canada