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Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Fortified Sites

Date > 1700 > 1750-1759

Camp of the 43rd Regiment of Foot during the siege of Fort Beauséjour, June 1755

Type: Image

The men of the British 43rd Regiment of Foot were part of a 2,000 strong army under Lietenant-Colonel Robert Monkton that took Fort Beauséjour after a brief siege in the summer of 1755. At left can be seen men of the grenadier company, distinguished by their pointed mitre headdresses. In the centre are ordinary soldiers who have the tricorne hats worn by most of the regiment. The young men to the right are drummers, wearing coats with reversed colours (white with red facings instead of red with white). This was intended to make drummers easy to spot in a fight, which was important, since drum beats were used to give orders. The presence of women and children seem odd in a military encampment, but each British regiment would have a small number of soldiers' families following them on campaign. Reconstruction by Lewis Parker. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Map of the siege of Quebec, 1759

Type: Image

This 1810 plan of the 1759 siege of Quebec was based on the survey made by order of Admiral Saunders, the Royal Navy commander of the expedition. (Library and Archives Canada, C-014523)

Site: National Defence

Brigadier James Wolfe - Battle for a Continent - Fortress Louisbourg

Type: Document

Synopsis of television episode on James Wolfe's role in the siege of Louisbourg. Wolfe was determined to avenge the French general the Marquis de Montcalm's North American victories. It was at Cormorant Cove, which the French neglected to protect, that Wolfe first tasted glory and acquired a reputation for recklessness that would grow. This episode is part of the "Canada: A People's History" series. Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

British Invasion - Battle for a Continent - Fortress Louisbourg

Type: Document

Synopsis of television episode of the British attack on the Fortress of Louisbourg. On June 1, 1758, a massive British force arrived at Louisbourg, led by commander General Jeffery Amherst. To Louisbourg Governor Augustin de Drucour, it appeared that the British were intent on killing everyone and burning the town. This episode is part of the "Canada: A People's History" series. Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The Military Art of the American Northwest

Type: Document

War in the Pacific Northwest centred around the canoe, which could be up to 20 metres long. Flotillas of canoes would attack enemy villages, hoping to capture prisoners to keep as slaves. Coastal forts of cedar logs were to be found, used to help control and tax maritime trade.

Site: National Defence

Division in Wolfe's Camp - Battle for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

The British bombing of Quebec lasted nine weeks, and still they could not take the city. The British camp was confused and divided. General James Wolfe could not decide where to attack and he faced growing opposition even within his own ranks. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Friction Before the War - Battle for a Continent - Fortress Louisbourg

Type: Document

Synopsis of television episode on England's plan to capture Louisbourg. The French fortress that guarded the entrance to the St. Lawrence River had long been a source of friction between France and Britain. The strategic fort was located on Île Royale and was the centre of the French fishing industry, a key military post, and training base for the French navy. This episode is part of the "Canada: A People's History" series. Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

A Stalled Effort

Type: Document

In the late summer of 1759, time pressed on the British besiegers of Quebec - to avoid winter, they would have to raise the siege in October. After the failure at Montmorency, Wolfe's British army began a campaign of pillaging and burning Canadian homes, striking at the Canadian militia.

Site: National Defence

Preparing for Battle - Montcalm and Wolfe - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

General Montcalm prepares for battle against the British in Quebec City. He must deal with a medical crisis, as only 400 troops, many sick and dying, come to reinforce the French. An equally forlorn and pessimistic General Wolfe will lead the British assault on Quebec. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, video clips, and a biography of General Montcalm.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Bombing Ignites the City - Battle for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

The British siege of Quebec began the night of Thursday, July 12, 1759. In that first day, three hundred British bombs fell on Quebec. Many churches were destroyed. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation