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Engineering and Naval Construction

Type: Document

Thanks to its supplies of wood and iron ore, Canada was the site of a shipyard building ships for the French Navy from 1739. A series of warships and transports were built. This site of a major shipyard in a colony was most unusual for the period.

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Location and Recognition- Background; Timeline

Type: Document

Founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, Quebec City was the capital of the French colony until 1759, when British troops conquered it. The city and the colony were brought into the British empire in 1763 by the treatise of Paris. Canada and the city of Quebec remained an English colony until the confederation of Canada in 1867

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Structure and Organization of Forts & Châteaux - Two Châteaux

Type: Document

The Saint-Louis forts and châteaux site is complex. It consists of three elements: the forts, châteaux and gardens. There were a total of four forts and two Châteaux.

Site: Parks Canada

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Architecture and Urban Plan for the Glory of the Monarchy!

Type: Document

In Quebec City, the relationship between defence and urban development was evident from 1636. The link was even closer later on, as much in general planning as in the network of streets, squares and blocks

Site: Parks Canada

The Board of Ordnance - a Separate Fiefdom

Type: Document

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the Board of Ordnance was a separate government department. It supplied weapons and ammunition to the army and Royal Navy, and built fortifications and all other military buildings. It was also responsible for the Royal Artillery and the Royal Engineers.

Site: National Defence