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Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Weapons > Land-based Weaponry and Vehicles

Resource Type > Document

Military Land Vehicles - Transportation

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

Listing of films from the National Film Board. Snowmobiles, trucks and track vehicles are the major modes of transport used by Canadian land forces. On this site are found films on the background of these means of transportation and instructions on their operation.

Site: National Film Board of Canada

Code Name: Tank

Type: Document

The tank was a technical marvel of war and an antidote to the rule of the machine gun. The tank was able to penetrate any defensive position and was employed in ever increasing numbers.

Site: National Defence

The 12-Pounder Field Gun - Weapons used by Canadians in the South African War

Type: Document

The 12-pounder breech-loading gun that equipped the Brigade Division, Royal Canadian Field Artillery in South Africa replaced the 9-pounder rifled muzzle loading guns that had equipped Canada's field artillery units since the 1870s.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Visit to Canadian Army Tank Brigade - England - World War Two

Type: Document

The First Canadian army Tank Brigade, commanded by Brigadier F.F. Worthington, arrived in the United Kingdom at the end of June 1941. Major Stacey paid a visit to this unit two months after its arrival in England. He made note of what battalions made up this group as well as their training and equipment.

Site: National Defence

The Colt Model 1895 Machine Gun - Weapons used by Canadians in the South African War

Type: Document

The legacy of the Canadian experience with machine guns in South Africa was that the Canadian Expeditionary Force went to war in 1914 armed with the Colt machine gun.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Battle of Leliefontein - South African War

Type: Document

Leliefontein was the most desperate situation faced by Canadians during the South African War. In the morning of November 6, 1900, British and Canadian troops dispersed a large Boer commando across the Komati River. Later, British troops retreated to Belfast while the Royal Canadian Dragoons covered their rearguard. The Boers used the British retreat as an opportunity to launch strong attacks against the Canadian Line.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Situation of the Canadian Military Forces Overseas, Winter, 1943-44 - I - Progress in Equipment (February 1942 - December 1943)

Type: Document

The period between February 22, 1942 and December 31, 1942 witnessed many important changes and developments in the area of military equipment for the Canadian Army Overseas. This report deals with those changes.

Site: National Defence

Situation of the Canadian Military Forces Overseas - Progress in Equipment (January - December 1944)

Type: Document

The Canadian Army Overseas during 1944 experienced many problems with weapons and vehicles. The major development in this year was the assault landing in Normandy and the campaign that followed. The assault required a large amount of special equipment. Providing these and equipping the Canadian Army for battle was the main concern in the first half of 1944.

Site: National Defence

From Footmen To Soldiers

Type: Document

Professional soldiers were a recent development in the Europe of 1500. They fought for pay, not for loot or feudal obligation, and could have firearms as weapons.

Site: National Defence

The Black Day of the German Army

Type: Document

The attack at Amiens succeeded beyond all expectations and shattered the reputation of the German Army. A combined arms assault by infantry, tanks, motorized machine-guns and mortars, and effective artillery coordination with air superiority, destroyed over seven German divisions in a single day. Thereafter, the Germans referred to August 8th as the Black Day.

Site: National Defence