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Subject > Wars, Battles and Conflicts > Canada, the nation, since 1867

Date > 1800 > 1880-1889

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: End of a Long Reign

Type: Document

Wilfrid Laurier's penchant for compromise allowed him to remain in power for 15 years, earning him the nickname of the "Great Conciliator". But in 1911, this talent proved inadequate to the task of winning elections.

Site: Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: Compromise, Laurier's Approach to Solving Conflicts

Type: Document

Throughout his career, compromise would remain the main political strategy Laurier used to settle conflicts. A staunch defender of national unity, he was called on to solve a series of major controversies which set Canadians against one another.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada: Historic Themes

Type: Document

Louis Riel was born in Saint Boniface in 1844 and was educated in Montréal. When he returned to the Red River Settlement in 1868, he found the community anxious and divided over its political future.

Site: Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

The Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada is located in Saint-Lin-Laurentides, a town 50 km north of Montreal. The site commemorates one of the most important figures in Canadian political history, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the man often referred to as the father of modern Canada.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

This national historic site of Canada has close ties with Métis leader and a founder of Manitoba, Louis Riel. Occupying river lot 51 along the Red River, Riel House National Historic Site was Riel's family home, where his descendants continued to live until 1969.

Site: Parks Canada

Officer cadet, Royal Military College of Canada, 1954

Type: Image

Except for a few details, the full dress uniform of officer cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, remained essentially the same since the college was founded in 1874. As shown in this 1954 photo, only the shakos and pith helmets worn on parade by first-class officer-cadets disappeared, replaced by pill-box caps. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

Mary Riter Hamilton - Traces of War - Biographical Note

Type: Document

A brief biography of the war artist describing the motivation behind her paintings.

Site: Library and Archives Canada

Private, 65th Battalion (Mount Royal Rifles), circa 1880-1885

Type: Image

This Montreal battalion wore a dark-green uniform inspired by that of a British rifle regiment. During the early 1880s, the 65th retained the French-style shako abandoned by British rifles during the 1870s. The 65th Battalion (Mount Royal Rifles) would not be able to obtain a French title until 1902, when it was renamed the 65th Regiment Carabiniers Mont-Royal. Rifle battalions wore black equipment (instead of the white of other infantry). This man carries a Mark II Snider-Enfield short rifle with a sword bayonet fixed. The shorter 'two band' Snider was issued to rifle units and infantry sergeants. In 1885, the 65th fought with Major-General Strange's Alberta Field Force against the Cree at Frenchmen's Butte. Reconstruction by Ronald B. Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

York Redoubt - History

Type: Document

In 1793, at the outbreak of war between Britain and revolutionary France, harbour batteries were hastily erected to secure Halifax from attack by sea. In the 19th century York Redoubt and the Citadel used signal flags to keep each other informed of ships' movements. During the First World War, the site was used as barracks for assigned infantry and for troops waiting to go overseas. Early in the Second World War, the Redoubt was the nerve centre for harbour defences, and included an anti-submarine net. York Redoubt remained in military use until 1956.

Site: Parks Canada

The Price Of Exclusion

Type: Document

The attempt by Canadian military authorities to impose a British military tradition on the whole of the population during the years following Confederation in 1867 led to a lack of support by Francophones for the Militia. Each linguistic community mistrusted the other's motives.

Site: National Defence