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Subject > Wars, Battles and Conflicts > Canada, the nation, since 1867

Date > 1800 > 1850-1859

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: End of a Long Reign

Type: Document

Wilfrid Laurier's penchant for compromise allowed him to remain in power for 15 years, earning him the nickname of the "Great Conciliator". But in 1911, this talent proved inadequate to the task of winning elections.

Site: Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: Compromise, Laurier's Approach to Solving Conflicts

Type: Document

Throughout his career, compromise would remain the main political strategy Laurier used to settle conflicts. A staunch defender of national unity, he was called on to solve a series of major controversies which set Canadians against one another.

Site: Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

The Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada is located in Saint-Lin-Laurentides, a town 50 km north of Montreal. The site commemorates one of the most important figures in Canadian political history, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the man often referred to as the father of modern Canada.

Site: Parks Canada

Weapons

Type: Document

This section illustrates a selection of firearms and bladed weapons used by British and Canadian military units during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Site: National Defence

Military Costumes

Type: Document

This section is a collection of surviving artifacts and period artists' illustrations. Illustrated are uniform coats of officers or enlisted men from a variety of Canadian and British units that served in present-day Canada during the period 1780-1870.

Site: National Defence

York Redoubt - History

Type: Document

In 1793, at the outbreak of war between Britain and revolutionary France, harbour batteries were hastily erected to secure Halifax from attack by sea. In the 19th century York Redoubt and the Citadel used signal flags to keep each other informed of ships' movements. During the First World War, the site was used as barracks for assigned infantry and for troops waiting to go overseas. Early in the Second World War, the Redoubt was the nerve centre for harbour defences, and included an anti-submarine net. York Redoubt remained in military use until 1956.

Site: Parks Canada

Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Otter (1843-1929) - South African War

Type: Document

Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Otter became the first Canadian-born officer to command this country’s military. As commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry in South Africa, his no nonsense, no frills approach to soldiering brought him into conflict with the less disciplined ways of his officers and men, but his austere professionalism got results.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel B. Steele (1849-1919) - South African War

Type: Document

Recommended as the best man in Canada to lead a unit in South Africa by the North West Mounted Police, Samuel B. Steele took command of Strathcona’s Horse in 1899. After taking the unit back to Canada early in 1901, Steele returned to South Africa that same year to command a division of the South African Constabulary until 1906. He later commanded Canadian formations in England during the First World War.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Militia Unpopular with Francophones

Type: Document

By 1870, French Canadians were strongly underrepresented in the ranks of the Volunteer Militia. They felt excluded by the institution, which seemed to like playing at soldiers. The fact that the French language was grudgingly tolerated at best was a big problem as well.

Site: National Defence

Lieutenant-Colonel Charles W. Drury (1856-1913) - South African War

Type: Document

Charles W. Drury was known as the ‘Father of Modern Field Artillery in Canada’ for his many innovations. He accompanied the first Canadian contingent to study military developments during the South African War.

Site: Canadian War Museum