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Subject > Wars, Battles and Conflicts

Date > 1700 > 1790-1799 > 1798

Weapons

Type: Document

This section illustrates a selection of firearms and bladed weapons used by British and Canadian military units during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Site: National Defence

Military Costumes

Type: Document

This section is a collection of surviving artifacts and period artists' illustrations. Illustrated are uniform coats of officers or enlisted men from a variety of Canadian and British units that served in present-day Canada during the period 1780-1870.

Site: National Defence

Military Bands

Type: Document

The British likely introduced the military band to Canada. These regimental musicians were paid for by individual units. Instrumentation favoured flutes, clarinets and percussion. The bands played a strong role in the social life of garrison towns throughout Canada.

Site: National Defence

British at Fort Chambly

Type: Document

After the Conquest in 1760, the British moved into Fort Chambly. This website describes the role of the fort during the invasion of Canada by the Americans in 1775-1776 and again in the War of 1812.

Site: Parks Canada

Militia of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island

Type: Document

This report discusses the organizational features of the militia of the separate provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island prior to Confederation.

Site: National Defence

Demobilization and Retirement

Type: Document

Before reforms in the mid-19th century, most British soldiers left the army only when their regiment was disbanded in the aftermath of a war. When this occurred in Canada, men were offered land to encourage them to settle in the colony. Pensions were rare, and worth little.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Militia Prior to Confederation

Type: Document

This report discusses the growth and development of the Canadian Militia from its beginnings in early New France until Confederation in 1867.

Site: National Defence

Entertainment

Type: Document

During the 18th and 19th centuries, alcohol and prostitutes were not the only forms of entertainment available to British soldiers. Cards and dice were popular, as was singing and playing music. The army tried to encourage reading, and it set up schools for the illiterate majority.

Site: National Defence

Sir John Johnson House National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

Sir John Johnson House is significant for its architectural design and for being one of the oldest surviving buildings in Ontario. Also important is its historical connection to Sir John Johnson, who encouraged United Empire Loyalist to settle in the St. Lawrence River Valley after the American Revolution.

Site: Parks Canada

York Redoubt - History

Type: Document

In 1793, at the outbreak of war between Britain and revolutionary France, harbour batteries were hastily erected to secure Halifax from attack by sea. In the 19th century York Redoubt and the Citadel used signal flags to keep each other informed of ships' movements. During the First World War, the site was used as barracks for assigned infantry and for troops waiting to go overseas. Early in the Second World War, the Redoubt was the nerve centre for harbour defences, and included an anti-submarine net. York Redoubt remained in military use until 1956.

Site: Parks Canada