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Subject > Politics and Society > Museums, Monuments and Memorials

Date > 1900 > 1960-1969

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada: Historic Themes

Type: Document

Louis Riel was born in Saint Boniface in 1844 and was educated in Montréal. When he returned to the Red River Settlement in 1868, he found the community anxious and divided over its political future.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada: The Métis

Type: Document

The term Métis, like the 'mestizo', has its origins in the Latin word 'mixticius' which means a person of mixed racial ancestry. Métis, however, describes more than race-it refers to a culture and a nation that played a significant role in the history of the Canadian West and is now a proud part of the Canadian mosaic.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Saving HMCS Haida

Type: Document

Unlike so many of the Tribals, she was spared from the scrapyard, thanks to the efforts of a private organization, HAIDA Inc. which bought her from the Navy for use as a museum ship.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

This national historic site of Canada has close ties with Métis leader and a founder of Manitoba, Louis Riel. Occupying river lot 51 along the Red River, Riel House National Historic Site was Riel's family home, where his descendants continued to live until 1969.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Service Post-WWII

Type: Document

Converted after the war to a destroyer-escort, (DDE) and bearing the new pennant number 215, HMCS Haida served two tours of duty in Korea.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

HMCS Haida, a Tribal Class destroyer built in England, was commissioned into the Royal Canadian Navy in 1943, serving in many theatres of operation through the Second World War. After a post-war refit, Haida continued in service through Korean War and Cold War situations, until she was decommissioned in 1963. The ship was acquired by the Province of Ontario and moved to Ontario Place (Toronto) in 1971. The ship was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada in 1984 by the federal government, and ownership was transferred to Parks Canada in 2002. HMCS Haida arrived at Pier 9 in Hamilton Harbour on August 30, 2003, the 60th anniversary of her commissioning.

Site: Parks Canada

Canada's War Art

Type: Document

This site describes the history and source of the Canadian War Museum's war art collections of 13,000 works. It describes the origins of the Canadian War Memorials of the First World War (1914-1918), the Canadian War Records of the Second World War (1939-1945), and the post-war Canadian Armed Forces Civilian Artists Program.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Holding Up Half the Sky: Women's History Lesson Plan

Type: Document

"Women hold up half the sky" is a saying that values the contributions of women to our world. This activity introduces some of Canada's remarkable female "agents of change" and the organizations with which they worked.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Rescuing Athabaskan Survivors

Type: Document

In late April, on night patrol in the Channel, Haida sank a German destroyer. A few nights later, on April 29th, the 10th Destroyer Flotilla came upon two more German destroyers off the coast of France. Haida and Athabaskan pursued them. Unfortunately, a torpedo struck Athabaskan; there was a tremendous explosion and she began to sink.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Last Remaining Tribal Class Destroyer

Type: Document

When the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada designated Haida as being of national historic significance in 1984, they gave two reasons: because of her role in naval combat, and because she is the last of the Tribal class destroyers.

Site: Parks Canada