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Subject > Politics and Society > Museums, Monuments and Memorials

Date > 1800 > 1870-1879

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: End of a Long Reign

Type: Document

Wilfrid Laurier's penchant for compromise allowed him to remain in power for 15 years, earning him the nickname of the "Great Conciliator". But in 1911, this talent proved inadequate to the task of winning elections.

Site: Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada: Compromise, Laurier's Approach to Solving Conflicts

Type: Document

Throughout his career, compromise would remain the main political strategy Laurier used to settle conflicts. A staunch defender of national unity, he was called on to solve a series of major controversies which set Canadians against one another.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada: Historic Themes

Type: Document

Louis Riel was born in Saint Boniface in 1844 and was educated in Montréal. When he returned to the Red River Settlement in 1868, he found the community anxious and divided over its political future.

Site: Parks Canada

Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

The Sir Wilfrid Laurier National Historic Site of Canada is located in Saint-Lin-Laurentides, a town 50 km north of Montreal. The site commemorates one of the most important figures in Canadian political history, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the man often referred to as the father of modern Canada.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada: The Métis

Type: Document

The term Métis, like the 'mestizo', has its origins in the Latin word 'mixticius' which means a person of mixed racial ancestry. Métis, however, describes more than race-it refers to a culture and a nation that played a significant role in the history of the Canadian West and is now a proud part of the Canadian mosaic.

Site: Parks Canada

Riel House National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

This national historic site of Canada has close ties with Métis leader and a founder of Manitoba, Louis Riel. Occupying river lot 51 along the Red River, Riel House National Historic Site was Riel's family home, where his descendants continued to live until 1969.

Site: Parks Canada

British at Fort Chambly

Type: Document

After the Conquest in 1760, the British moved into Fort Chambly. This website describes the role of the fort during the invasion of Canada by the Americans in 1775-1776 and again in the War of 1812.

Site: Parks Canada

History of Fort Wellington National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

This web page is devoted to the history of Fort Wellington from its construction as a defensive fortification on the St. Lawrence River to its designation as a National Historic Site in 1925.

Site: Parks Canada

Batoche National Historic Site of Canada - Unrest in the North West

Type: Document

Feeling betrayed by the government, unrest began to grow in the Metis population. The First Nations people and western settlers also felt they had been let down by Sir John A. Macdonald. This article describes the actions taken prior to inviting Louis Riel to lead his people in this new struggle.

Site: Parks Canada

The Budding Explorer: Samuel de Champlain: Activity

Type: Interactive Resource

Help the ghost of Samuel de Champlain regain his memory of Canada`s national historic sites in an interactive game for younger children.

Site: Parks Canada