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Date > 1900 > 1930-1939

Chapter 4 - Between the Wars 1919-1939

Type: Document

During the inter-war years of 1919-1939 the Canadian military experienced large-scale reorganization which included major diversification and expansion of communications capabilities. In many cases these capabilities would grow to serve civilian as well as military needs and would put the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals in the unique position of being the only branch of the Armed Forces that continued to expand during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Site: National Defence

Belmont Battery at Fort Rodd Hill, British Columbia

Type: Image

Built in 1898-1900 to protect the entrance to the Royal Navy (and later the Royal Canadian Navy) base on the Pacific, the battery has been restored to its appearance during the Second World War 1939-45. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Policy Governing the Finding and Selection of Officers for the CASF (later CAA)

Type: Document

One of the problems that confronted the Department of National Defence at the outbreak of war in 1939 was the provision of officers for the rapidly-expanding armed forces of Canada. Mobilization instructions from 1937 detailed the available sources from which such officers might be drawn, but said nothing about the methods of their selection.

Site: National Defence

Officer cadet, Royal Military College of Canada, 1954

Type: Image

Except for a few details, the full dress uniform of officer cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, remained essentially the same since the college was founded in 1874. As shown in this 1954 photo, only the shakos and pith helmets worn on parade by first-class officer-cadets disappeared, replaced by pill-box caps. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

Problem of Selection and Reallocation of Personnel in the Canadian Army Overseas, 1939-1946

Type: Document

This report is an attempt to deal with aspects of recruitment, training, and psychological assessment in order to best utilize the manpower available to the Canadian Army Overseas.

Site: National Defence

Enemy Air Action and the Canadian Army in the United Kingdom, 1939-43

Type: Document

This report is an account of the effect of enemy air action on units and men of the Canadian Army in the United Kingdom during the period 1939 – 1943, and of the part played by Canadian units in the defence of Britain against the enemy air force in those years.

Site: National Defence

Bristol Bolingbroke IVT bomber

Type: Image

The Bristol Bolingbroke was a Canadian version of the British light bomber known as the Bristol Blenheim. Bolingbroke was the name given to the Canadian-built version of the Blenheim Mk. IV. Over 600 were built by the Fairchild plant at Longueuil, Quebec, starting in 1939. The Bolingbroke was the first modern, all aluminium aircraft built in Canada, but it was also obsolete before the first example flew. Nevertheless, for lack of anything better, the design was widely used. In July 1942, a Bolingbroke helped sink a Japanese submarine off British Columbia. The photograph shows a surviving Bolingbroke Mk IVT from the collection of the Canadian Aviation Museum. 457 of the Mk IVT were built and used as navigation and gunnery trainers (DND, PCN-5234)

Site: National Defence

Some Aspects of Disciplinary Policy in the Canadian Services, 1914-1946

Type: Document

The most significant development in disciplinary policy during the period covered by this report was the process by which complete control of punishment in the Canadian forces passes from British to Canadian authorities. This process began in the First World War and was completed as a result of constitutional changes in the period before the outbreak of the Second World War.

Site: National Defence

Military Cooperation within the Commonwealth, 1939-1945

Type: Document

The countries of the Commonwealth, on balance, managed to get along quite well together and to cooperate effectively in prosecuting a war in which the interests of all of them were very much at stake. This paper looks at the satisfactory nature of the relationship and also some of its more serious problems during the Second World War.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Women's Army Corps Overseas, September 1939 - June 1944

Type: Document

The first proposal to organize Canadian women for military service in the United Kingdom was in September 1939. In April 1944 approval was granted for the employment of the C.W.A.C. in rear areas of operational theatres. In between these dates there were many changes in the military that allowed for this approval.

Site: National Defence