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Beating the Amerindians at Their Own Game

Type: Document

The British column sent to relieve Fort Pitt was attacked by Pontiac's men on August 5, 1763. Using the Amerindian's own tactics, the British routed the natives. After this defeat, the Amerindian sieges of the remaining British-held forts were lifted, and Pontiac's coalition dissolved.

Site: National Defence

Amerindian Displeasure

Type: Document

The change in 1761 from French to British garrisons in the forts of the West brought trouble. The local Amerindian nations preferred the French, and had no love for the Americans, who treated the land as a conquest ripe for colonization.

Site: National Defence

Pontiac's Whirlwind Campaign

Type: Document

In 1763, led by Algonquin chief Pontiac, an alliance of Amerindian peoples captured most of the British-held forts and posts in the west. Only three of those attacked held out, and they were subjected to lengthy sieges.

Site: National Defence

The British Response

Type: Document

In the summer of 1763, the British were worried about losing the fur trade because of Pontiac's revolt against them. General Amherst, the British commander in North America, sent two forces to retake the western forts that had been captured by Pontiac's men.

Site: National Defence

Canadians in British Service

Type: Document

To help fight against Pontiac's revolt in the west, British general Murray raised a battalion of Canadian Volunteers in the spring of 1764. Being paid for military service was new to the Canadians, but recruiting was slow at first. People were afraid that men would be joining the army for life.

Site: National Defence