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Subject > Strategy and Tactics > Fortifications

Resource Type > Image > Map

Fort Frontenac, 1758

Type: Image

At the upper left are the British trenches dug during the short 1758 siege of Fort Frontenac. A portion of the foundations of the fort are still to be seen in present-day Kingston, Ontario.

Site: National Defence

Fort La Présentation in the 1750s

Type: Image

Established in about 1718, Fort La Présentation was rebuilt from 1748. This was an important base for French allied Indians on the upper St. Lawrence River who were much influenced by Father Piquet, a Sulpician missionary. In 1752, it was described by John Defever as having ‘a town of about forty wigwams, and have a French priest among them’ next to the fort. It was taken by the British in 1760 and is now the town of Ogdensburg, NY.

Site: National Defence

Plan of Fort Erie in September 1814

Type: Image

The British post at Fort Erie was extensively rebuilt by the Americans who captured it during the summer of 1814. The view here shows the rebuilt fort surrounded by the American camp as in September 1814.

Site: National Defence

Fort Frontenac in 1758

Type: Image

Fort Frontenac in 1758, now Kingston, Ontario. Founded in 1673, this fort was also called Cataraqui (several possible spellings) but eventually retained the name of its founder, Governor General Count Louis de Buade de Frontenac et de Palluau. It was the most important French fort on Lake Ontario until Fort Niagara was built in the 1720s. Fort Frontenac was taken by a large force under Lt. Col. Bradstreet in 1758 and thereafter abandoned. The site was later used for military purposes by the British and Canadian armies. This sketch shows at the upper left the Anglo-American batteries put up during the 1758 attack.

Site: National Defence

Fort Chambly as shown in a plan of 1718

Type: Image

This was the third Fort Chambly. It was built of stone in an impressive castle-like design. (Library and Archives Canada, C-015885)

Site: National Defence

Plan of the fortifications at Île-aux-Noix 1759-1760

Type: Image

The fortifications shown on this plan of Île-aux-Noix were not completed, notably to the north. In the south, the bottom half of the fort shown with six bastions was built by the French in 1760 as a large semi-circular artillery battery instead. The British batteries (not shown) were built on the eastern shore (left) of the Richelieu River and bombarded the French works from 16 to 20 August 1760. The French troops then slipped away at night.

Site: National Defence

Map showing the extent of Pontiac’s uprising during 1763-1764

Type: Image

The uprising of 1763-1764 was spread over a wide region. Of the posts shown on this map, only Fort Pitt (Pittsburgh) and Fort Detroit remained under British control.

Site: National Defence

Map of the 1665-1666 campaigns of the régiment de Carignan-Salières

Type: Image

The map shows the region in which the régiment de Carignan-Salières campaigned against the Iroquois during 1665-1666. After landing in Quebec, the regiment went to Montreal, built several forts on the Richelieu River, made a failed winter foray against the Iroquois to the south and followed with a successful one in September.

Site: National Defence

Plan of Fort Saint-Jean, 1700

Type: Image

A fort was first built on this site in 1645 and was originally known as Fort Charnisay. Later, in the 1670s, it was named Fort Martignon. In 1698, the French commandant in Acadia, the Chevalier Robineau de Villebon, had the fort rebuilt according to this plan and named it Fort Saint-Jean. It was abandonned in the early 1700s. It was built on the site of what is now the city of St. John, New Brunswick.

Site: National Defence

Sketch map of American attacks on Quebec, 31 December 1775

Type: Image

Shown are the routes General Montgomery's and Arnold's columns took when attacking the Lower Town, as well as the feints made against the walls of the Upper Town. The real fighting took place in the cramped streets of the Lower Town, where darkness, cold and confusion made for some desperate fighting at the barricades.

Site: National Defence