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Volunteer, Victoria Voltigeurs, 1851-1858

Type: Image

The Victoria Voltigeurs were members of a volunteer unit of Métis raised on Vancouver Island in 1851. Their clothing and weapons were provided by the Hudson's Bay Company. The Voltigeurs acted as a combination of military unit and police force until 1858. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Private, Nova Scotia Rangers, circa 1750

Type: Image

The Nova Scotia Rangers were the very first British regular corps raised in North America. Also known as Goreham's Rangers, after their commanding officer, the men were mostly Amerindians and Métis. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Gabriel Dumont, military commander of the Métis during 1885

Type: Image

Gabriel Dumont (1837-1906) was a brilliant tactician. Historians generally concede that had Dumont fully controlled Métis operations in 1885, the Canadian volunteers would have faced a much tougher campaign. This photograph probably dates from Dumont's time travelling with Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show after the Rebellion. (Library and Archives Canada, PA-178147)

Site: National Defence

Louis Riel, 1870-1871

Type: Image

This image of Louis Riel is part of a group photograph of the councillors of the Provisional Government of the Métis Nation, taken sometime during 1870-1871. (Library and Archives Canada, PA-012854)

Site: National Defence

Battle of Fish Creek, 24 April 1885

Type: Image

This print of the 24 April 1885 battle of Fish Creek was based on sketches by a Toronto militiaman who was part of General Middleton's column. 150 Métis and Teton Sioux led by Gabriel Dumont attempted to ambush the 900 Canadians as they approached the deep ravine of Fish Creek. The inexperienced militia spent the day trying to drive Dumont from his position without success. Although the battle itself was a stalemate, the Canadians retreated and halted their advance towards Batoche for two weeks. The figures in green are the 90th Winnipeg Battalion of Rifles, while those in red are the 10th Battalion Royal Grenadiers (who did not really take part in the fighting).

Site: National Defence

Métis house burns at Batoche, 9 May 1885

Type: Image

Early in the morning of 9 May 1885, as the Canadian army was moving in the direction of the church at Batoche, they were fired upon from two houses outside the village proper. This was the first move of the four day battle at Batoche. The guns of A Battery of the Canadian Regiment of Artillery opened fire and the Métis marksmen fled. The militia then set fire to the houses to prevent them from being used again as cover by the Métis. The commander of A Battery was an amateur photographer, and he captured the smoke in this photograph he entitled 'Opening the ball at Batoche'. The horses and guns of the artillery can be seen beyond the fence at right. (Library and Archives Canada, C-003464)

Site: National Defence

A Métis, a member of Louis Riel's troops in Manitoba, in 1869

Type: Image

This 'Red River insurgent', to use the picture's original caption, was first seen in the 'Canadian Illustrated News' of December 18, 1869. Metis male clothing of this era included a 'capot crait-rien' (hooded coat), 'culottes bavaloises' (trousers that opened at the hip), HBC flannel shirts, moccasins and a sash of the pattern known as a 'ceinture fléchée'. Sources also mention brightly coloured cotton shirts, navy blue corduroy trousers and leather 'mitasses' (leggings).

Site: National Defence