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Militia Budgets

Type: Document

The budgets allocated by Parliament often affected the size of the militia and how many men would be trained. Cycles of economic crisis and boom in the 1870's had an impact on militia activity and proficiency.

Site: National Defence

The Economic Boom

Type: Document

A war economy led to a more heavily industrialized Canada and prepared it for the economic boom that followed.

Site: National Defence

Training and the Evolution of the Militia

Type: Document

The founding of the Royal Military College in 1876 and the building of the Dominion Arsenal at Quebec improved the militia and its equipment, but many challenges remained. Developments within Canada, such as the creation of the transcontinental railway, influenced the formation of the militia with more units being formed in the cities rather than the countryside.

Site: National Defence

A Lack of Enthusiasm

Type: Document

Participation rates for militia service often rose and fell depending on how much pay was allocated by the government. Long distances to training camps and better wages in civilian jobs reduced the enthusiasm of men wishing to be part of the militia.

Site: National Defence

Veterans Reintegration

Type: Document

Canada's plans for reintegration of veterans into society was launched well before the end of the war. A number of programs were available for education, job resumption, medical and insurance coverage, and generous allowances for both male and female service members.

Site: National Defence