History Browser

Search Results

Fears of French Fleets

Type: Document

France's 1778 entry into the American Revolutionary War spread fear in several places. The Maritimes worried about a French fleet disrupting shipping in the Gulf of St. Lawrence or attacking Newfoundland. In Quebec, officials worried about Canadian reaction to a French landing.

Site: National Defence

Recruiting Sergeants

Type: Document

Recruiters would entice potential volunteers with false tales of the easy, glorious life they would lead in the military, and told stories of riches to be won. Getting the men drunk also played an important part in recruiting practices.

Site: National Defence

Western Thrust Under American General Hull

Type: Document

To the astonishment of the British, the first American attack during 1812 was in the far west from Detroit. An army led by the inexperienced American General Hull, the Governor of Michigan, crossed the border and took the town of Sandwich, Upper Canada, in July 1812

Site: National Defence

Canadian Involvement

Type: Document

English Canada entered WW1 without understanding the full consequences, and hoping for a short conflict. Opposition to the war within the Empire came from Ireland and South Africa, while Quebec Francophones all-out refused to participate.

Site: National Defence

Threat in the Pacific

Type: Document

Canada's Defence Plan No. 2 envisaged a war in the Pacific between Japan and the United States, and laid plans to protect Canada in such a conflict. In 1941, Canada sent two battalions to Hong Kong to support the British. The Pacific coast was ill-prepared until the invasion of the Aleutian islands and the shelling of Estevan Point in British Columbia by the Japanese Navy. Fear of a Japanese invasion created a panic and 22,000 Japanese-Canadians were interned.

Site: National Defence

The Canadian War Memorial Fund and War Artists

Type: Document

On the initiative of a Canadian born Britisher, Lord Beaverbrook, the Canadian War Records Office was founded in 1916 to collect records of Canadian war accomplishments. This work was expanded by the Canadian War Memorial Fund, which hired Canadian artists to portray the experience of war both overseas and at home.

Site: National Defence

German bombardment of Arras, 1914

Type: Image

Arras is a town with a priceless architectural heritage. It lies in north-western France near the border with Belgium. In 1914, the destruction of Arras reinforced Allied propaganda comparing the Germans to barbarians. This painting by Belgian artist Gustave Faipont shows the Hotel de Ville (city hall) of Arras, with its beautiful Belfoi (bell tower). Both were largely destroyed during the war. Many other historic Belgian and French towns suffered similar fates during the Great War. (private collection)

Site: National Defence

More Discontent in the French Ranks

Type: Document

In the summer of 1757, even an unexpected victory at Fort Carillon was not enough to quell squabbling in the French camp. General Montcalm's tactless praise of his French metropolitan troops raised the ire of the Canadian and colonial troops, who had played little part in the battle.

Site: National Defence

French Canadian Reaction

Type: Document

In 1793, the execution of King Louis XVI by French revolutionaries, and the British declaration of war against France were shocks to the French Canadians. They mourned the king, and read propaganda circulated by the French ambassador to the United States with cautious interest.

Site: National Defence