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Organization > National Defence

Subject > Politics and Society

Date > 1900 > 1980-1989

Tackling the Language Issue

Type: Document

It would take two defence Ministers, Paul Hellyer and Leo Cadieux, and the Forces Chief of Staff, General Jean V. Allard, to give the impetus to real change in Canada's armed forces. While advances have been made in instruction and training, and the number of francophone units; the problem of integrating two official languages in military operations has yet to be solved.

Site: National Defence

Volunteer, Canadian Rangers, 1988

Type: Image

An Inuit volunteer with the Canadian Rangers, who have been active in the Canadian Arctic since 1947. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 88-367)

Site: National Defence

Canadian Forces Headquarters (CFHQ) Reports, 1965-1980

Type: Document

From 1965-1980, Colonel C.P. Stacey organized the Directorate of History out of the three former separate Service historical sections. He introduced the practice of writing historical narratives of current operations or on topics of contemporary interest. The Canadian Forces Headquarters Reports deal with peacekeeping, naval aspects of the Second World War, and the organization and structure of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Department of National Defence from colonial times.

Site: National Defence

The Effect of NATO

Type: Document

Participation in NATO accelerated Canada’s military rearmament program after the Second World War, and remained a high political priority even when reductions affected the size of the forces in Europe. NATO’s political and economic aspects were seen as essential for Canadian security, and even promoted the 1980’s rearmament programs.

Site: National Defence

Korea and the Commitment Overseas

Type: Document

The Korean War accelerated the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, with some wondering if Europe was the next to be attacked. Canada contributed another special service unit – the 27th Infantry Brigade Group to serve in Germany. As well, the Air Force contributed a full Air Division and the Navy was given an anti-submarine role in protecting the North Atlantic sea lanes.

Site: National Defence

Lockheed CF-104 Starfighter, 417 Strike/Reconnaissance Operational Training Squadron, Canadian Forces, 4 June 1983

Type: Image

The U.S.-designed CF-104 Starfighter had a top speed of 1,260 knots (2,334 kph) and served in the Royal Canadian Air Force and Canadian Forces from 1961 to the mid-1980s. It equipped squadrons based in Germany. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 83-943)

Site: National Defence

A New View and Vision

Type: Document

A shift of sorts has occurred since the times of the colonial French and British regimes. While Canadian society still depends on major allies to defend itself, relations have changed from one of subservience to the colonial regimes to an alliance with the United States. While attempting to assert a more obvious Canadian stance within these alliances, Canada has yet to take the final step to full independence with a robust fully funded independent military.

Site: National Defence

Peacemaking and the 1990-91 Gulf War

Type: Document

The Persian Gulf War of 1990-91 most resembled the Korean War with Canada sending elements from all three services. Participation was limited as Canadians were also deployed elsewhere around the world on United Nations.

Site: National Defence

NATO’s Canadian Clause

Type: Document

Clause 14 in the NATO treaty is described as the “Canada clause”. This clause promoted an economic aspect to the alliance that was initially opposed as being too much at the time.

Site: National Defence

McDonnell CF-101B Voodoo fighter, 425 'Alouette' All-Weather Fighter Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, circa 1974

Type: Image

A CF-101B Voodoo fighter intercepts a Soviet Tupolev Tu-95 'Bear' bomber used for reconnaissance in Canadian air space. This type of incident was frequent during the Cold War. Made in the U.S., the Voodoo was the Canadian Forces' main fighter from 1961 to 1984. With a top speed of only 1,220 kts (1,963 km/h), the Voodoo was definitely inferior to the CF-105 Avro Arrow. (Canadian Department of National Defence, 84-940)

Site: National Defence