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Organization > Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Date > 1800

Subject > Politics and Society

Upper Canada, the Maritimes and the War of 1812 - Introduction to Traitors and Heroes - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

A description of the ambivalent attitude of the Maritimes and Upper Canada towards the war against the Americans in this excerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History." Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Conquered and the Conquerors - British Control of Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

After the conquest, a new Canada slowly took shape. The Canadian militia returned to their villages and farms. 500 French soldiers, married to Canadian women, were allowed to stay. 3000 British troops remained in Quebec. Bigot was put in the Bastille for corruption, and died in exile in 1778. Governor Vaudreuil was arrested for his role in the colony's loss. General James Wolfe became a virtual industry in death, as biographies, ballads, epic poems, and paintings of him abounded. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Isaac Brock - Introduction - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

By 1811, Britain's obsession with making war on France was making a dangerous enemy of the United States. Some Congressmen called for war; they knew they couldn't attack Britain directly but they could threaten her colonies. Upper Canada was vulnerable, especially at Niagara and along the Detroit frontier. To Isaac Brock, Brigadier-General of the British forces in Upper Canada, the warning signs were ominous. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Capture of Fort Garry - The Métis Resistance

Type: Document

The sale of Rupert's Land by the Hudson's Bay Company to the government of Canada in 1869 sets off a chain of events that lead to the Red River Resistance. Its leader is a young, worldly Métis named Louis Riel. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Return From Exile - Louis Riel Comes Home to Lead his People - The North West Rebellion

Type: Document

When Louis Riel returned from exile in 1884 he once again tried to unite the people of the prairies. While not originally advocating rebellion, Riel's attitude changed as time passed and he felt ignored by the federal government. His religious delusions and his militancy became stronger. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

John A. Macdonald's Response - The Métis Resistance

Type: Document

William McDougall was designated the first lieutenant governor of the North-West territories in 1869. His attempts to fill that position met with resistance from Métis inhabitants. Meanwhile, Prime Minister John A. Macdonald tried to placate Louis Riel and his provisional government by sending an emissary to the region. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Execution of Thomas Scott - The Métis Resistance

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

John Christian Schultz, member of a nationalistic political group called Canada First, organizes an attack on Fort Garry in response to the Red River Resistance led by Louis Riel. Riel's execution of a prisoner named Thomas Scott, who is linked to this group, proves to be the downfall of the resistance movement. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

North West Rebellion

Type: Document

The North West Rebellion lasted less than three months in the spring of 1885. But the prairie uprising had an enduring effect on a nation. Its leader, Louis Riel, became a permanent symbol of language, religious and racial divisions in Canada. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Anger in the West - The North West Rebellion

Type: Document

In the early 1880s, the seeds of rebellion were planted as frustration grew on the Canadian prairies. Natives were starving; the Métis were losing land; and settlers felt the Canadian government was indifferent to the farmers’ problems. In desperation, some tried to form alliances to strengthen their voices. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games,

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation