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Subject > Armed Forces > Military Ceremony and Honours > Awards, Decorations and Medals

Organization > National Defence

Weapons

Type: Document

This section illustrates a selection of firearms and bladed weapons used by British and Canadian military units during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Site: National Defence

Fighting in the Rivera

Type: Document

In fighting along the Cote d’Azur at the end of WW2, the Canadian officer Ralph Wilson Becket won the American Silver Star, along with Sergeant Thomas Price, the most decorated Canadian aboriginal soldier.

Site: National Defence

Expanding the Canadian Contingent

Type: Document

A second contingent of Canadian soldiers was offered to the British with better training and suitability for South African service. This contingent was composed of five field artillery batteries and two mounted infantry battalions. Canada’s first overseas Victoria Crosses were won by members of this group.

Site: National Defence

Duties and Honours

Type: Document

British army officers were primarily responsible for supervising the activities of their men. The British took up the practice of awarding military medals only in the nineteenth century. First for officers only, then for all ranks, campaign medals became a source of great pride.

Site: National Defence

Canadians in Imperial Air Forces

Type: Document

Many Canadians excelled as combat pilots throughout the war zones and later laid the ground-work for an independent Canadian Air Force.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Participation in the Defence of Hong Kong, December 1941

Type: Document

This report deals with the organization and despatch of a Canadian Expeditionary Force to Hong Kong in October 1941, and the Force's subsequent operations during the siege of that island by the Japanese.

Site: National Defence

D-Day - the 6th of June Landing

Type: Document

The Canadian Army played a significant role in the D-Day landings, with the 3rd Infantry division and the 2nd Armoured Brigade landing on Juno Beach. The 1st Parachute Battalion preceded the landings, and further divisions followed to form the 2nd Canadian Corps. Heavy casualties slowed the taking of Caen, and costly battles followed at Verrieres Ridge and the Falaise Gap after fighting the best German SS formations.

Site: National Defence

The Last Battles

Type: Document

The Allied offensive continued with the Canadian Corps advancing to penetrate the Hindenburg and Herman Lines by moving towards Cambrai and the Canal du Nord.

Site: National Defence

Onto Italy

Type: Document

Following the invasion of mainland Italy, crumbling Italian resistance and German reluctance to defend the Calabria region allowed Canadian troops to advance quickly up the Italian peninsula until they reached Campobasso. From then on Canadians met determined resistance from elite German troops who exploited the geography of Italy, with deep valleys and rivers, to defend their positions.

Site: National Defence

La Vérendrye's Sons Continue the Search

Type: Document

Louis-Joseph and François La Vérendrye ventured even farther than their father, reaching as far south as Nebraska and as far west as Wyoming. They were the first Europeans to record seeing the Rocky Mountains in 1743.

Site: National Defence