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Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life > Wages and Pensions

Date > 1600 > 1670-1679

Pay

Type: Document

A soldier's pay was never high, and very seldom adjusted as the cost of living increased. From 1797 to 1867, the rate was a shilling (12 pence) a day, from which deductions were made for food, clothing and other expenses. Little money would be left to spend as a man wished.

Site: National Defence

One Big Family

Type: Document

There was a close liaison between the officers and the commercial class in New France. Marriage alliances cemented families together, and a kind of colonial military caste began to form in the colony in the eighteenth century.

Site: National Defence

Retirement

Type: Document

Prior to 1712, discharged soldiers had no sort of pension to fall back upon when they left the military. They were forced to beg, or rely on religious charity if they were unable to earn their living.

Site: National Defence

Officers' Incomes

Type: Document

Officers received very little income from their military rank - usually far less than the expenses the position demanded. As a result, some officers in New France without other income were very poor.

Site: National Defence

The Governor General's Guard

Type: Document

During the period when New France was a colony of the French crown, the Governor General was authorized to have a small group of bodyguards, just as was the case in the provinces of France. The men often wore the Governor General's personal livery as a uniform.

Site: National Defence