History Browser

Search Results

Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life > Recruitment and Demobilization

Date > 1600

A Canadian Military Elite is Born

Type: Document

The officers of the Compagnies franches de la Marine became more and more Canadian in nature as time passed. Eventually, a majority of these men were born in the colony, and the French-born officers also established strong roots in Canada.

Site: National Defence

Recruiting Sergeants

Type: Document

Recruiters would entice potential volunteers with false tales of the easy, glorious life they would lead in the military, and told stories of riches to be won. Getting the men drunk also played an important part in recruiting practices.

Site: National Defence

Compagnies franches de la Marine in Canada

Type: Document

The organization of the Compagnies franches de la Marine in New France varied depending on the type of company and the period involved. However, one constant was that the companies were kept up to strength in officers, and were usually short of common soldiers.

Site: National Defence

The Colony Expands

Type: Document

A new settlement was begun, westwards of Quebec in Iroquois territory at Ville-Marie (later Montreal) in 1642. Another big development for the colony was the arrival of 60 soldiers paid for by the Queen of France.

Site: National Defence

Officers Make a Difference

Type: Document

The officers of the Compagnies franches de la Marine made an important impact in the colony. The high proportion of officers in the companies allowed the sons of local gentlemen a military role, first as cadets and later as officers.

Site: National Defence

Soldiers Of The Canadian Expeditions

Type: Document

The soldiers accompanying early expeditions worked for private businesses, not for the state. Many were veterans of European wars, or gentlemen seeking land or gold.

Site: National Defence

Militarizing New France

Type: Document

In Canada, the same solution was adopted as in the French Caribbean colonies. Starting in 1683, three 'Compagnies franches de la Marine' were sent to Quebec in response to governor La Barre's pleas for reinforcements to protect the colony against the Iroquois.

Site: National Defence

Acadia

Type: Document

When restored to France in 1667, Acadia also benefited from King Louis XIV's policy of strengthening his colonies. Royal troops were sent to the colony, but were soon disbanded. When France declared war on the Netherlands in 1672, poorly defended Acadia suffered badly at the hands of Dutch privateers.

Site: National Defence

Where Did They Come From?

Type: Document

The regular soldiers of New France were recruited in France, not Canada. The habitants showed no interest in military life as a career. Instead, professional recruiters for the Troupes de la Marine hunted for volunteers in Paris and around the great ports of France.

Site: National Defence

Specialized Militia Companies

Type: Document

In the towns of Canada, there developed over time units of militia of specialized nature. Examples include companies of artillery and 'reserve companies' of bourgeois used for guard and ceremonial duties.

Site: National Defence