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Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life > Recruitment and Demobilization

Organization > Canadian War Museum

Canadian Armed Forces: Demobilization - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

As World War II war drew to a close, members of all the armed forces of the Allies wanted nothing so much as to shed their uniforms, and fast. But there was not enough shipping available to bring Allied troops from all over the world as quickly as they wished.

Site: Canadian War Museum

2nd Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles, in the South African War

Type: Document

The Canadian Department of Militia and Defence would equip and train the new regiment for South Africa, and the British would pay its costs. When the unit finally sailed from Canada in January 1902, it was a six-squadron regiment of 901 officers and men. Together with the 10th Canadian Field Hospital, it formed the third Canadian contingent of the Canadian Mounted Rifles.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Conscription. 1939-1945

Type: Document

In April 1942, the federal government held a national plebiscite asking Canadians to release it from its “no conscription” pledge. While more than 70% of Canadians voted “yes”, four-fifths of Quebecers voted “no”.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Going Home. 1945-1946

Type: Document

Following the German surrender, most Canadian troops returned to Canada in early 1946, while Canadians who stayed to serve the Allied occupation of Germany returned by mid-1946.

Site: Canadian War Museum

A Garrison Country - Newfoundland and Labrador during the Second World War

Type: Document

Online article describes the transformation of Newfoundland into a "garrison country" during World War Two and the economic, political and social consequences of this. Includes reading list.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Politics and Government : Conscription - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Conscription, or compulsory military service, divided the nation in the Second World War and threatened the survival of political leaders. Features newspaper articles pertaining to the conscription issue.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Women’s Army Corps, 1941-1946

Type: Document

Online article about the formation of the Canadian Women’s Army Corps during the Second World War, a milestone in the history of women’s participation in the Canadian military. Includes reading list.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Les Purs Canadiens - French Canada and Recruitment during the first World War

Type: Document

When Canadians learned they were at war in 1914, few Canadians could have predicted at this time that their nation soon would become a major participant in the worst conflict the world had yet seen, or that the war would place enormous political and social strains on Canada. Following the nation-wide outbursts of patriotism in August 1914, French-Canadian support for the war began to decline. There existed among French Canadians a tradition of suspicion and even hostility towards the British Empire, and, while sympathetic to France, Britain’s ally, few French Canadians were willing to risk their lives in its defence either.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Canada at Britain's side. 1939-1942

Type: Document

During the month when Canada declared war against Germany its forces grew rapidly, with 58 000 new volunteers.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Canada goes to War. 1939

Type: Document

After Parliament debated the matter, Canada declared war on Germany on 10 September, despite being unprepared for war.

Site: Canadian War Museum