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Resource Type > Image

Interior of soldiers' barracks at St. Andrews by-the-Sea, New Brunswick, 1854

Type: Image

Painted by a British officer of the 76th Regiment of Foot, this watercolour of the 1850s confirms that open fireplaces still heated some barracks, despite wood stoves being introduced in the 1840s. The man at centre wears a grey military greatcoat, while others wear the red regimental coat. At right can be seen several soldier's beds, each with storage above for a knapsack, clothing and accoutrements. (Library and Archives Canada, C-008404)

Site: National Defence

Reconstructed earth and timber house at l’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland

Type: Image

This house was reconstructed in the style of those built by the Vikings at l’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland around the year 1000. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

The billeted soldier's departure, circa 1790

Type: Image

In 18th century Canada, a good many soldiers were ‘billeted’ (lodged) in private houses rather than in barracks.

Site: National Defence

Private, Royal Fencible Americans, Fort Cumberland, 1775-1776

Type: Image

During the siege of Fort Cumberland (formerly the French Fort Beauséjour) during the winter of 1775-1776, the soldiers of this newly raised unit had no uniforms; old blankets and even barrack rugs were pressed into service. Reconstruction by Derek Fitzjames. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Typical town of the north-eastern Amerindians

Type: Image

These towns nearly always featured long bark covered houses encircled by a log stockade wall for protection. Print inspired from John White’s late 16th century renderings.

Site: National Defence

Canadian infantry barracks room, circa 1890

Type: Image

A rare glimpse into life as it was in a Canadian infantry barracks room during a winter evening in about 1890. Some men are shown cleaning their kit, the floor or a Snider-Enfield infantry rifle, one is being shaved, another trims his moustache and one is reading. The barracks furniture features the British iron folding bed and barrack table with iron legs. The men’s uniforms and equipment are neatly hung or shelved and a stove, essential in a Canadian winter, is prominent. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

A view of a Viking settlement in America

Type: Image

This view was conceived during the 1930s by historical artist Fergus Kyle (1876-1941). Although we now know that Viking helmets did not have horns, as shown here and in countless other images in popular art, most of the other details shown give a relatively realistic impression of what such a settlement might look like. The Vikings also could build timber houses as well as ones made of earth.

Site: National Defence

American rebel soldier during the siege of Quebec, 1775-1776

Type: Image

The rebel forces laying siege to Quebec in the winter of 1775-1776 suffered greatly from the harsh climate. They were forced to improvise winter clothing and shelter. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

British Army folding iron barrack bed

Type: Image

This type of bed gradually replaced wooden double bunks from 1824. Every day, the bed was folded and the mattress rolled up for inspection. Army Circular Memorandum of 12 June 1860.

Site: National Defence

French infantry soldiers in camp, 1667

Type: Image

The French troops of the régiment de Carignan-Salières posted in Canada from 1665 would have a similar appearance to soldiers shown in this 1667 image.

Site: National Defence