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Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life > Education and Training

Date > 1600 > 1670-1679

The Nature of the Militia

Type: Document

Participation of the general populace of New France in the militia provided an important link between a hierarchical absolutist government and a population known for being proud and independent. Although membership was non voluntary, this was not resented by the men involved.

Site: National Defence

The Royal Navy

Type: Document

As an island state, Britain gave priority to its navy. The Admiralty (the appointed committee of admirals which made all strategic decisions) governed hundreds of ships worldwide. The Royal Navy used its bases in Canada to help control the Northern Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Site: National Defence

Irregular Soldiers And Hardened Voyageurs

Type: Document

French colonists in Canada were skilled at shooting and using canoes and snowshoes to travel great distances. These skills were useful for mounting military raids. The Canadians were reluctant to fight in the militia during the 1670s, but became more enthusiastic when war with the Iroquois resumed.

Site: National Defence

Officers' Duties

Type: Document

Officers were responsible for supervising and leading their men. Their lives were very different from the common soldiers', but relations between the ranks were usually good, in part because of the nature of warfare in New France.

Site: National Defence

The Establishment of a Canadian Militia

Type: Document

In 1669, King Louis XIV ordered Governor de Courcelles to create a militia from the Canadian settlers. Governor Frontenac did much work after his appointment in 1672 to organize the institution in each parish within the colony.

Site: National Defence

In the Regiment

Type: Document

New recruits to the British army during the 18th and 19th centuries were sent to a regimental depot. There, they were issued clothing and equipment and started to learn how to drill and to handle a weapon. They were given a (cursory) medical and formally enlisted before a magistrate.

Site: National Defence

An Improved Volunteer Militia

Type: Document

Motivated by the Fenian raids of 1866, Canada made a number of attempts to improve its Volunteer Militia. In particular, the volunteers were given training camps in which to learn their job alongside British regular troops. Modern weapons were also found to equip the troops.

Site: National Defence