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Subject > Armed Forces > Military Life

Resource Type > Image

Date > 1900

Corporal, Royal 22e Régiment, Italy, 1943

Type: Image

During the summers in southern Italy, the Canadians wore tropical uniforms like the rest of the British 8th Army. This reconstruction by Ron Volstad shows a corporal of the Royal 22e Régiment, the only Francophone regular infantry regiment in the Canadian army during the war. The unit saw its first action of the war during the landings in Sicily in 1943. Note the famous red patch of the 1st Canadian Division on the upper shoulder. This formation badge dates from the First World War. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Officer, Royal Canadian Navy, 1940-1945

Type: Image

This officer with his dufflecoat and binoculars is dressed as he would have been on watch at sea. With all badges of rank covered, there is nothing to show his rank, or if he is a member of the Royal Canadian Navy or the Royal Canadian Navy Reserve. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Casualty evacuation, U.N. Protection Force in ex-Yugoslavia (UNPROFOR), 1994

Type: Image

Canadian military personnel evacuating a wounded United Nations soldier in Bosnia, 1994. (DND, 94-501A-4)

Site: National Defence

Corporal, Canadian Forces, United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), circa 1975

Type: Image

This reconstruction by Ron Volstad shows a Canadian 'Blue Beret' serving with the United Nations peacekeeping forces in Cyprus, circa 1975. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Officer cadet, Royal Military College of Canada, 1954

Type: Image

Except for a few details, the full dress uniform of officer cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario, remained essentially the same since the college was founded in 1874. As shown in this 1954 photo, only the shakos and pith helmets worn on parade by first-class officer-cadets disappeared, replaced by pill-box caps. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-2049)

Site: National Defence

Lieutenant, Canadian Air Force, 1920-1924

Type: Image

When the Canadian Air Force was authorized in February 1920, they were given the dark blue uniform seen in this painting of a pilot ranking as a lieutenant. Rank was shown by the traditional army system of crowns and stars, and pilots wore wings on the left breast. King George V granted the designation Royal Canadian Air Force in 1923. When the service was made a permanent part of the Department of National Defence the following year, it adopted the lighter 'RAF blue' uniform worn by its British counterpart. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Officer, The Prince Edward Island Light Horse, circa 1912

Type: Image

In 1901, L Squadron was raised in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, as one of a number of independent Militia squadrons created in the style of the six regiments of Canadian Mounted Rifles raised for the South African War. The unit was expanded in 1903 to become the The Prince Edward Island Light Horse. This officer wears the regiment's red dragoon-style tunic with yellow facings.

Site: National Defence

Trooper, Canadian Mounted Rifles, 1900-1902

Type: Image

Six regiments of Canadian Mounted Rifles were sent to South Africa in 1900-1902, although the final four arrived after the end of the war, and saw no service. All of them had khaki uniforms. This man wears British-made clothing, issued to replace inferior Canadian uniforms made of canvas. The 'stetson' hat was the distinguishing mark of a Canadian soldier during the war. These were bought from an American company. The Mounted Rifles wore Oliver pattern equipment (invented by a British doctor and used only by the Canadians) made up of a belt, bayonet, and haversack, along with Orndorff pattern bandoliers from British stocks. They were armed with Lee-Enfield Mark I rifles. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Sergeant, 1st Regiment The Grenadier Guards of Canada, circa 1912

Type: Image

In 1859, the 1st Battalion Volunteer Militia Rifles of Canada was ranked as the senior volunteer infantry regiment in the colony of Canada. In the years that followed, this Montreal battalion adopted a series of ever more impressive titles. In 1860 it was the 'Prince of Wales's Regiment' , in 1900, the 'Prince of Wales's Fusiliers'. In 1912, despite protests from the British government that the Canadians had no claim to the title, the unit became 'The 1st Regiment The Grenadier Guards of Canada.' At this point, the Montrealers also assumed the uniform of the senior British regiment of Foot Guards. A sergeant in red tunic and bearskin can be seen in this plate.

Site: National Defence

Private equipped for Alpine winter combat training, Canadian Army, 1943

Type: Image

During WW2, troops were given specialized Alpine winter combat training in Yoho National Park, British Columbia. Despite several years of planning and training for a possible campaign in Norway, no such operation took place. The type of winter uniform shown in this 1943 photograph did see use in Europe, however. It was worn on winter patrols by units in the Nijmegen salient during the winter stalemate of 1944-1945. (Canadian Department of National Defence, ZK-330).

Site: National Defence