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Subject > Armed Forces > Military Command and Administration

Resource Type > Document

Date > 1700 > 1770-1779

The Americans Repulsed

Type: Document

During the battle of New Year's Eve of 1775, a column of American rebels led by General Arnold made one last attack on Quebec City. Arnold was wounded and many of his men captured when British governor Carleton attacked the rebels from behind.

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors-Three Spheres of Influence

Type: Document

The governor’s influence extended locally, regionally and across the continent.

Site: Parks Canada

Poor Canadian/American Relations

Type: Document

In the rebel-occupied Montreal of 1776, relations between the Canadians and the American invaders got worse. The rebels took hostages, and paid for supplies in worthless paper money. Friction between Roman Catholic locals and largely Protestant rebels caused trouble too.

Site: National Defence

Night Assault

Type: Document

The Americans rebels decided to try a three-pronged attack on Quebec City on the night of December 31, 1775. The first attack, a diversion, allowed General Montgomery to lead a second column against the Lower Town. Montgomery was killed and his troops routed by the defenders

Site: National Defence

Conquered and the Conquerors - British Control of Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

After the conquest, a new Canada slowly took shape. The Canadian militia returned to their villages and farms. 500 French soldiers, married to Canadian women, were allowed to stay. 3000 British troops remained in Quebec. Bigot was put in the Bastille for corruption, and died in exile in 1778. Governor Vaudreuil was arrested for his role in the colony's loss. General James Wolfe became a virtual industry in death, as biographies, ballads, epic poems, and paintings of him abounded. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

A Poorly Defended Colony

Type: Document

In 1775, the British colonies in the Maritimes were weakly garrisoned. Governor Legge of Nova Scotia, unable to get additional regular troops, used local militia companies to help guard against the American rebels and their sympathizers.

Site: National Defence

Carleton Rallies the Defenders

Type: Document

In November 1775, Governor Carleton organized the defenders of Quebec City to face a siege by the American rebels. British regular troops were few in number. Canadian militia, from both the anglophone and francophone communities, made up the majority of the defenders

Site: National Defence

The Militia and Fatigue Duties

Type: Document

In 1777, after British general Burgoyne's defeat while attacking the American rebels to the south, Quebec had to fear an invasion. The Militia Act was used to get men for 'fatigue duties' - military road construction and maintenance. This caused problems when it was unfairly applied.

Site: National Defence

The Royal Navy

Type: Document

As an island state, Britain gave priority to its navy. The Admiralty (the appointed committee of admirals which made all strategic decisions) governed hundreds of ships worldwide. The Royal Navy used its bases in Canada to help control the Northern Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Site: National Defence

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada: Roles and Functiions of Colonial Governors-British Administration

Type: Document

In 1763, France lost Canada to England. Henceforth, British governors presided over the colony on behalf of the English king

Site: Parks Canada