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Subject > Armed Forces > Naval Forces and Merchant Navy

Date > 1900 > 1920-1929

Belmont Battery at Fort Rodd Hill, British Columbia

Type: Image

Built in 1898-1900 to protect the entrance to the Royal Navy (and later the Royal Canadian Navy) base on the Pacific, the battery has been restored to its appearance during the Second World War 1939-45. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Canada and the First World War - Canada in World Affairs. 1920-1939

Type: Document

In 1931, Great Britain passed the Statute of Westminster, giving Canada the legal status of an independent country. During the years between the two world wars, Canada avoided overseas military commitments, but began to modernize and re-equip its forces in the mid-1930s in case of another major war.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the First World War - Canada between the Wars. 1919-1939

Type: Document

Aside from creating the Royal Canadian Airforce in 1924, the Canadian government avoided large expenditures for developing its armed forces between the end of the First World War and the beginning of the Second World War.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Defence Strength Between the Wars

Type: Document

This table provides information about Canada's defence budgets, number of military personnel, ships, and aircraft from 1923 to 1939.

Site: National Defence

A History of Canadian Naval Aviation, 1918-1962

Type: Document

The history of Naval Aviation in Canada.

Site: National Defence

The Navy 1919-1939

Type: Document

Post WW1, the Canada decided to retain a navy. Ships and submarines were purchased from Britain, and efforts were made to create a more professional force and establish a reserve. The Navy was successful in obtaining newer destroyers before 1939, but in small numbers.

Site: National Defence

Canada's Merchant Navy - Valour at Sea

Type: Document

Table of contents for the online version of the booklet written by Patricia Giesler and Veterans Affairs Canada. It deals with the activities of the Canadian Navy during the First and Second World Wars.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Rating, HMCS Niobe, Royal Canadian Navy, 1910-1920

Type: Image

This rating is one of the crew of HMCS Niobe, the second ship of the Naval Service of Canada (the 'Royal Canadian Navy' after 1911). Canadian naval uniform was identical to that of the Royal Navy except that, instead of 'HMS,' the cap tally on the Canadian headdress read 'HMCS,' for 'His Majesty's Canadian Ship.' HMCS Niobe was moored in Halifax harbour on 6 December 1917. Seven of the crew were fighting the fire aboard the ammunition ship Mont Blanc when the infamous Halifax Explosion occured. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Introduction - Valour at Sea - Canada's Merchant Navy

Type: Document

In both the First and Second World Wars, the men of the Allied merchant navies faced U-boat attacks, storms, raiders, air attacks, and mines while they transported millions of tonnes of food, munitions, petroleum and troops across the world. Here these brave men and women are remembered.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada