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Subject > Armed Forces > Naval Forces and Merchant Navy

Date > 1700 > 1760-1769

British Fleet Lifts the Siege

Type: Document

Despite having won a battle outside the city in April 1760, the French army was unable to retake Quebec. General Murray, commanding the British defenders, refused to give up. A siege began for control of the city, but a British fleet arrived with more men, ending the contest.

Site: National Defence

Compagnies franches de la Marine (Warships)

Type: Document

The names of troops raised by the French Ministry of Marine often confuse people. There were separate units of Compagnies franches de la Marine to serve aboard warships. These troops had nothing to do with the Compagnies franches found in Canada.

Site: National Defence

The Military Art of the American Northwest

Type: Document

War in the Pacific Northwest centred around the canoe, which could be up to 20 metres long. Flotillas of canoes would attack enemy villages, hoping to capture prisoners to keep as slaves. Coastal forts of cedar logs were to be found, used to help control and tax maritime trade.

Site: National Defence

War and the Foundation of Canada - The Seven Years’ War

Type: Document

During the 1750s, British North American colonies grew to the point that they began to spread into territory already occupied by the French colonies and First Peoples. After the expulsion of British settlers in 1754, an undeclared war broke out between French and British colonies.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Vice-Admiral Charles Saunders, Royal Navy

Type: Image

Vice-Admiral Charles Saunders (circa 1715 - 1775) commanded the British fleet during the 1759 siege of Quebec.

Site: National Defence

A Series of Amerindian Nations

Type: Document

During the eighteenth century, the northwest Pacific coast was home to a series of Amerindian nations, including the Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, Nootka and Salish. These were maritime cultures - excellent sailors and fishermen who depended on the sea's resources

Site: National Defence

The French Lose Hope

Type: Document

Although a British fleet arrived first at Quebec in the spring of 1760, France had sent a tiny convoy with reinforcements as well. These were blockaded and captured by the British. Meanwhile, morale among the French troops in New France plummeted, and desertion became a problem.

Site: National Defence

Battle between the French frigate Atalante and the English fleet in 1760

Type: Image

When General Lévis's French army broke its siege of Quebec in May of 1760, the retreating force was accompanied by a number of small vessels. When the British attempted to capture these ships, the French warships sacrificed themselves to cover the retreat. Seen here is Captain Jean Vauquelin's frigate Atalante, run aground but still fighting after her companion Pomone was sunk.

Site: National Defence

England Wins the War

Type: Document

In the early 1760s, peace talks begun in an attempt to end the Seven Years' War. Hoping to improve its bargaining position, France captured St. John's, Newfoundland. Britain quickly retook the city. In the end, Britain and its allies dictated the terms of peace.

Site: National Defence

Reinforcements from Europe - Another Fight for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

After the French victory at the Battle of Ste. Foy, both the French and British armies waited to see whose navy would first come up the St. Lawrence. After eleven days of suspense, a ship appeared. The British had won the transatlantic race. William Pitt had sent 22 ships from England. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation