History Browser

Search Results

Subject > Armed Forces > Land Forces

Date > 1600 > 1670-1679

Canadian Militia Prior to Confederation

Type: Document

This report discusses the growth and development of the Canadian Militia from its beginnings in early New France until Confederation in 1867.

Site: National Defence

Pay

Type: Document

A soldier's pay was never high, and very seldom adjusted as the cost of living increased. From 1797 to 1867, the rate was a shilling (12 pence) a day, from which deductions were made for food, clothing and other expenses. Little money would be left to spend as a man wished.

Site: National Defence

The Military Wedding

Type: Document

During the 18th and 19th centuries, marriage for the common British soldier was governed mostly by custom. Marriage involved 'leaping over the sword', where bride and groom did just that in the presence of the man's companions. Official permission was needed in theory, but seldom given.

Site: National Defence

Soldiers' Wives

Type: Document

As units moved from posting to posting within the British empire during the 18th and 19th centuries, some soldier's wives (up to 6 per company) were transported with their husbands at government expense. Before each move, a lottery was held. Losers were abandoned without support.

Site: National Defence

Recruitment

Type: Document

Most of the British army was recruited in Great Britain. By the mid-19th century, half of the men were English or Welsh, one third Irish and the remainder Scottish. Recruits were (in theory) volunteers signed up by a regimental recruiting party, and service was for life (until 1847).

Site: National Defence

Navy Troops in the West Indies

Type: Document

The French Ministry of the Navy maintained a small colonial army to protect French possessions in the West Indies and Guyana.

Site: National Defence

In the Regiment

Type: Document

New recruits to the British army during the 18th and 19th centuries were sent to a regimental depot. There, they were issued clothing and equipment and started to learn how to drill and to handle a weapon. They were given a (cursory) medical and formally enlisted before a magistrate.

Site: National Defence