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King's and Regimental Colours, 41st Regiment of Foot, 1802-1815

Caption: King's and Regimental Colours, 41st Regiment of Foot, 1802-1815

All regular regiments of infantry (or 'foot') in the British army during the War of 1812 had two colours. The King's colour was blue with the red and white crosses of St. George and St. Andrew superimposed. This was the 'union flag', carried after Ireland was joined to Great Britain in 1801. The second (or 'regimental') colour was usually in same colour as a unit's facings, but regiments with red (like the 41st), white or black facings carried a white flag with a red cross of St. George. In the corner (or 'canton') was a small depiction of the union flag. The regiment's name ('XLI REGT.' here) was displayed in the centre, often within a wreath of roses (for England), thistles (for Scotland) and shamrocks (for Ireland). Surviving records show that the 41st received colours of the new pattern in 1802, which they carried until a new set were provided in 1815. (Parks Canada)